Recipe: Spicy Vege Burger Patties

How to Make Spicy Veggie Burger Patties
FOOD_VEGE-BURGER

Veggie burgers make a satisfying meal and are easy to make at home.
While some store-bought veggie burgers have the reputation of being bland,
or even unhealthy, you can spice up homemade veggie patties in plenty of ways.
Combining rice and beans in a burger patty provides a complete protein and
makes for a well-rounded, nutritious meal. Chipotle chilies give these black
bean veggie burger patties a kick. Finish with your favorite toppings.

Things You’ll Need

1 (14-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 cup cooked brown rice

2 tablespoons red onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced

1 chipotle chili in adobo sauce, chopped
1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste
Olive oil or canola oil for cooking

Cook the brown rice according to package instructions. You’ll need one cup cooked, which is the equivalent of 1/3 cup uncooked rice.

It’s easiest to cook 1 cup of dry rice (yielding 3 cups cooked) and save the leftover cooked rice for other uses.

In order to make black bean burgers spicy, you can use fresh diced jalapeno,  leaving the seeds in, dried cayenne pepper or canned chipotle chilies in adobo sauce.

Chipotle chilies are very spicy, so you’ll only need one pepper for the recipe and can
use the remaining chilies for future uses.

Step 1: Prepare the Base

Pour the cooked brown rice and drained and rinsed black beans into a mixing bowl.
Use a fork to mash the beans, leaving them somewhat chunky.

Step 2: Chop the Vegetables

Finely chop the red onion, garlic and chipotle chili. Make sure the pieces are very fine
so they can become well incorporated with the burger patties.

Step 3: Mix

Add the onion, garlic, chili, ground cumin and salt to the mixing bowl with the rice and beans.

Stir everything together until well-incorporated. The rice and bean mixture will be thick,
slightly sticky and very malleable.

Step 4: Form Patties

Form the mixture into a large ball, and then divide it into four equal sections.
Make a small ball out of one of the sections and press between your palms to
flatten into a burger patty.

Make patties out of the remaining three sections of the mixture, and place all of the patties on a plate.

Step 5: Cook

Heat a large (10-inch) skillet to medium-high, and add enough cooking oil to generously coat the surface,
about 3 tablespoons.

Carefully place all of the burger patties on the hot skillet. Cook until crispy, about 2 to 3 minutes.
Carefully flip the patties and cook an additional 2 to 3 minutes until golden-brown on both sides.

Step 6: Serve

Toast burger buns, and make complete veggie burgers with your favorite toppings, such as fresh greens, avocado, tomato and onion.

Link:  http://www.ehow.com/how_4695949_spicy-veggie-burger-patties.html

Healing Power of Bananas!

The Healing Power of Bananas! Banana Super Smoothie (in your blender) 2 ripe Bananas (peeled) 1 large Pear 3/4 cup Pineapple (no skin) 1 cup Coconut Water. (and if you can, use the fresh flesh) 1/2 inch fresh Ginger Root (peeled) Blend and serve. It's delicious and fantastic for RELIEVING CONSTIPATION. See Below: Bananas contain three natural sugars - sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy. CONSTIPATION: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives. DEPRESSION: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier. PMS: Forget the pills - eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood. ANEMIA: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia. BLOOD PRESSURE: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit's ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke. BRAIN POWER: 200 students at a Twickenham school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert. HANGOVERS: One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system. HEARTBURN: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief. MORNING SICKNESS: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness. MOSQUITO BITES: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation. NERVES: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.. ULCERS: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chroniclercases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach. So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has FOUR TIMES the protein, TWICE the carbohydrate, THREE TIMES the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals.. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, 'A BANANA a day keeps the doctor away!' (source unknown)

The Healing Power of Bananas!

Banana Super Smoothie (in your blender)

2 ripe Bananas (peeled)
1 large Pear
3/4 cup Pineapple (no skin)
1 cup Coconut Water. (and if you can, use the fresh flesh)
1/2 inch fresh Ginger Root (peeled)

Blend and serve. It’s delicious and fantastic for RELIEVING CONSTIPATION.

See Below:

Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.

CONSTIPATION:
High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

DEPRESSION:
According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

PMS:
Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

ANEMIA:
High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

BLOOD PRESSURE:
This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

BRAIN POWER:
200 students at a Twickenham school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

HANGOVERS:
One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

HEARTBURN:
Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

MORNING SICKNESS:
Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

MOSQUITO BITES:
Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

NERVES:
Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system..

ULCERS:
The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chroniclercases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has FOUR TIMES the protein, TWICE the carbohydrate, THREE TIMES the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals.. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, ‘A BANANA a day keeps the doctor away!’ (source unknown)

Helpful Fatty Acids Found in Organic Milk

More Helpful Fatty Acids Found in Organic Milk
By Kenneth Chang
The New York Times, December 9, 2013
  Straight to the Source
FOODS_RAW_MILK2

Whole milk from organic dairies contains far more of some of the fatty acids that contribute to a healthy heart than conventional milk, scientists are reporting.

The finding, published Monday in the journal PLOS One, is the most clear-cut instance of an organic food’s offering a nutritional advantage over its conventional counterpart. Studies looking at organic fruits and vegetables have been less conclusive.

Drinking whole organic milk “will certainly lessen the risk factor for cardiovascular disease,” said the study’s lead author, Charles M. Benbrook, a research professor at Washington State University’s Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources.

“All milk is healthy and good for people,” he continued, “but organic milk is better, because it has a more favorable balance of these fatty acids” – omega-3, typically found in fish and flaxseed, versus omega-6, which is abundant in many fried foods like potato chips.

Under government requirements for organic labeling, dairy cows must spend a certain amount of the time in the pasture, eating grassy plants high in omega-3s; conventional milk comes from cows that are mostly fed corn, which is high in omega-6s. Nonorganic cows that graze in pastures also produce milk with greater amounts of omega-3s.

The research was largely funded by Organic Valley, a farm cooperative that sells organic dairy products. But experts not connected with the study said the findings were credible – though they noted that the role of milk in a healthy diet and the influence of fatty acids in preventing or causing cardiovascular disease are far from settled.

“I think this is a very good piece of work,” said Dr. Joseph Hibbeln, a nutritional neuroscientist at the National Institutes of Health.

For more information on this topic or related issues you can search the thousands of archived articles on the OCA website using keywords:

DICHOTOMY!

 

FOODS_MEDS3

FYI: ALOE VERA USES

Eat Fruit!

 

The Rewards of Eating Locally Grown Food | Health Freedom Alliance

The Rewards of Eating Locally Grown Food | Health Freedom Alliance.

The Rewards of Eating Locally Grown Food

Submitted by Brooke Addison on December 15, 2011

Eating local foods is better for you, for the environment, and for your taste buds. Local food is fresher and tastes better than food that been trucked or flown in from thousands of miles away. Think you can’t taste the difference between lettuce picked yesterday and lettuce picked last week, factory-washed, and sealed in plastic? You can. ~ Health Freedoms

By Jane Schwartz Harrison

Did you know that a typical carrot or broccoli stalk travels about 1,500 miles before it lands on your salad plate?

Caught up in our fast-paced world of quick marts and large grocery stores, many of us don’t give a second thought to where our food comes from.

Enter a new health movement: eating locally. The concept is to buy food produced, grown, or raised as close to home as possible. This includes fruits and vegetables, as well as items like meats, poultry, eggs, and milk.

The benefits of “going local”
Of course, you support your local farms and economy when you choose to eat local foods. But there are other benefits.

It helps the environment.

  • Minimizing “food miles” (the distance food travels before reaching store shelves) reduces the fuel it takes to get your food across the state or country.
  • Food processors use a large amount of paper and plastic packaging to keep food fresh longer. This packaging becomes waste that is hard to reuse or recycle.
  • Small farms tend to use fewer chemicals than large factory-style farms.

It enhances your nutrition.

  • As a general rule, local food is fresher, riper, better-tasting, and of overall better quality than commercially produced food that has shipped thousands of miles.
  • Because it’s locally distributed, the food requires minimal preservatives and/or processing.
  • When you buy from local farmers, you can find out if the food is free of chemicals, pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, and genetically modified organisms.
  • Local food may not always look perfect, but it is less likely to wilt and rot before its time.

Sticking close to home
Don’t know where to begin? Start small by replacing 1 or 2 food items a week with local produce. Buy only locally grown tomatoes, or use only freshly picked apples in the fall.

Your supermarket may sell local produce. In addition:

Frequent a farmer’s market. Usually open from spring through fall, farmer’s markets offer a full range of fresh produce from local farms. You can also find other local goodies like eggs, breads, jams, honey, and flowers.

Pick your own. What could be better than biting into a sweet juicy pear you’ve just picked from a tree? Become familiar with the local farms in your area where you can pick your own fruits or vegetables, or buy them there.

Plant a garden. Gardening is not just good exercise. Growing your own food is a healthy, rewarding pastime. And who doesn’t enjoy walking out the back door and picking a crisp cucumber (no wax) or a ripe red tomato right off the vine?

Join community-supported agriculture (CSA) or local food co-op groups. Many farms offer seasonal “shares.” You buy into a share or belong to a co-op and get seasonal fruits and veggies in return. The money goes toward the cost of growing and distributing a season’s worth of produce.

  • Members typically collect their food at a neighborhood site. Some farms deliver.
  • Weekly or bimonthly shares consist of a variety of vegetables and fruits, and sometimes other items.
  • Your family will learn to eat what is in season and to try new foods.Most farms include recipes and suggestions for preparing your fare.

Dine on local cuisine. Find restaurants in your area that use local ingredients. It’s a great way to support local agriculture and enjoy a relaxing meal at the same time.

Source: http://www.myoptumhealth.com/portal/Information/item/Locally+Grown+Foods+Can+Benefit+Your+He?archiveChannel=Home%2FArticle&clicked=true

Regular Olive Oil Consumption Lowers Stroke Risk by Forty Percent

NaturalNews.com
Originally published July 10 2011
Regular olive oil consumption lowers stroke risk by forty percent
by John Phillip

(NaturalNews) Critical research released in the industry publication journal Neurology from the American Academy of Neurology provides evidence that regular consumption of olive oil can help lower the risk of stroke. The study examined individuals over the age of 65 that are most vulnerable to the devastating effects of a stroke. Scientists suggest that olive oil taken as part of a healthy diet can lower the life-altering risks associated with a stroke by 41% in the elderly. Based on this body of work, researchers “suggest that a new set of dietary recommendations should be issued to prevent stroke in people 65 and older.”

To conduct the study, researchers examined the medical records of 7,625 aging adults 65 or older from three cities in France. Participants were in generally good health and had no prior history of stroke. Olive oil consumption was determined by use of dietary questionnaire and usage was broken down into three groups (none, moderate and intense) based on regular consumption habits. It is significant to note that virtually all olive oil consumed was extra virgin and cold pressed. This type of minimally processed oil has been found to lower the risk of heart disease in prior studies.

Participants were followed for a period of five years, and 148 strokes occurred during that time span. After considering dietary, lifestyle and medical history, researchers found that those with the highest intake of extra virgin olive oil were 41% less likely to suffer a stroke compared with those with the lowest consumption of the monounsaturated oil. In a secondary arm of this study where plasma fatty acid measurements were available, individuals with the highest oleic acid (olive oil fraction) were found to experience a 73% lower risk of stroke. (Read more)

Healthy snacks for kids: 10 child-friendly tips – MayoClinic.com

Healthy snacks for kids: 10 child-friendly tips – MayoClinic.com.

Healthy snacks for kids: 10 child-friendly tips

Healthy snacks for kids don’t have to be dull. Consider 10 tips for quick-and-healthy snacks.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Snacking is a major pastime for many kids — and that’s not necessarily bad. Nutritious snacking can help your child curb hunger throughout the day, as well as provide energy and important nutrients. Find out how to make healthy snacks for kids. (Read more)

Oakland officials threaten to shut down urban gardener growing food on her own land

Oakland officials threaten to shut down urban gardener growing food on her own land

Friday, April 08, 2011 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/031998_Oakland_urban_gardening.html#ixzz1J0ShlRDC

(NaturalNews) The city of Oakland, Calif., which is marked largely by blight and crime, has decided to go after a backyard gardener for growing and occasionally selling the fruits of her labor. According to a recent report in the San Francisco Chronicle (SFC), Oakland city officials are summoning Novella Carpenter to either pay a costly permit fee and penalties for providing locals with backyard produce items like Swiss chard without government approval, or face city sanctions.

The 4,500-square-foot plot of land on which Carpenter has been growing produce and raising some small animals is in a very rough part of Oakland. There are plenty of abandoned, graffiti-laden buildings, and empty plots of land — not to mention a severe lack of adequate grocery stores and food shops.

After allegedly squatting the land for several years, Carpenter finally decided to buy it several months ago for $30,000, and she now raises food for herself and her neighbors on it. Though she does sell some of it, the primary purpose of the lot is not to run a business. In fact, Carpenter has on numerous occasions allowed locals in need to come and pick food for their own use.

“When I started, I did it to feed myself,” explained Carpenter to SFC. “Then I realized that in Oakland, people are really hungry. So people in the neighborhood came and picked food.”

But Carpenter’s efforts to improve the conditions in her community by planting the garden and growing food recently met the heavy hand of government regulation. The SFC story explains that a city planner in Oakland’s building department recently became aware of Carpenter’s garden after allegedly receiving a complaint concerning some rabbits on her property. Though he has not issued a final report on the manner, the planner did state that because Carpenter sells some of her produce, she would be required to obtain a valid business permit.

The only problem is that the permit is likely to cost “several thousand dollars,” according to the report. And since Carpenter only makes roughly $2,500 a year before expenses, obtaining such a permit hardly seems viable or necessary under the circumstances, especially since she does not technically run a profitable business.

“It’s incredibly sad that people can’t grow food and sell it to folks,” said Barbara Finnin, executive director of City Slicker Farms, a nonprofit group in Oakland that helps people start urban farms and that operates produce markets, to SFC.

Sources for this story include:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/artic…

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/031998_Oakland_urban_gardening.html#ixzz1J0TBiYaj