Strawberries Top List of Fruits With Most Pesticides!

This Fruit Tops ‘Dirty Dozen’ List — Again

Healthy Living

Ranking the 12 fruits and veggies most likely to be contaminated

by Cheryl Bond-Nelms, AARP, July 11, 2017|

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For the second year in a row strawberries top the ‘Dirty Dozen’ list.

Fruits and vegetables are important to a healthy diet, but the annual report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) that ranks fruits and vegetables based on levels of pesticides may leave you confused about what is healthiest to eat.

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The EWG list is called the Dirty Dozen and includes fruits and vegetables considered “dirty” because of high levels of pesticide residue. At the top of the list? Strawberries, for the second year in a row.

The Dirty Dozen:

Strawberries
Apples
Nectarines

Peaches
Celery
Grapes

Cherries
Spinach
Tomatoes

Bell Peppers
Cherry Tomatoes
Cucumbers

The U.S. Department of Agriculture found that nearly 30 percent of strawberries tested contained the residue of more than 10 pesticides, and the dirtiest were linked to 21 pesticides.

Rinsing fruits and vegetables thoroughly before eating used to be the best advice, but the EWG report also states that strawberries were “most likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues even after they are picked, rinsed in the field and washed before eating.”

Although the statistics sound unnerving, the USDA states that “overall pesticide chemical residues found on the foods tested are at levels below the tolerances established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and do not pose a safety concern.”

Also, the EWG report doesn’t contain all bad news. The good news is a list of fruits and vegetables considered lower in pesticide contamination — the Clean Fifteen list.

The Clean Fifteen:

Avocados
Sweet Corn
Pineapples

Cabbage
Frozen Sweet Peas
Onions

Asparagus
Mangoes
Papayas

Kiwi
Eggplant
Honeydew Melon

Grapefruit
Cantaloupe
Cauliflower

Only 1 percent of the avocado samples tested positive for pesticide residue. And not one of the samples from the clean list tested positive for more than four types of pesticides, while a large percentage of pineapples, papayas, mangoes, kiwi and cantaloupes were found to have no detectable pesticide residue.

Still concerned? Experts suggest buying organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible as well as purchasing produce at your local farmers market.

Also of Interest

Good reason to eat more fruit
TELL US: Will ‘dirtiest’ fruits and veggies change your choices?
WATCH: Vegetables with curry dip

Source: Strawberries Top List of Fruits With Most Pesticides – AARP

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Food: Buy Direct!

Should You Be Able to Buy Food Directly From Farmers? The Government Doesn’t Think So

David E. Gumpert, Guest

FOODS_FARMERS-MARTThis would seem to embody the USDA’s advisory, “Know your farmer, know your food,” right? Not exactly.

For the USDA and its sister food regulator, the FDA, there’s a problem: many of the farmers are distributing the food via private contracts like herd shares and leasing arrangements, which fall outside the regulatory system of state and local retail licenses and inspections that govern public food sales.

In response, federal and state regulators are seeking legal sanctions against farmers in Maine, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and California, among others. These sanctions include injunctions, fines, and even prison sentences. Food sold by unlicensed and uninspected farmers is potentially dangerous say the regulators, since it can carry pathogens like salmonella, campylobacter, and E.coli O157:H7, leading to mild or even serious illness.

Most recently, Wisconsin’s attorney general appointed a special prosecutor to file criminal misdemeanor charges against an Amish farmer for alleged failure to have retail and dairy licenses, and the proceedings turned into a high-profile jury trial in late May that highlighted the depth of conflict: following five days of intense proceedings, the 12-person jury acquitted the farmer, Vernon Hershberger, on all the licensing charges, while convicting him of violating a 2010 holding order on his food, which he had publicly admitted.

Why are hard-working normally law-abiding farmers aligning with urban and suburban consumers to flaunt well-established food safety regulations and statutes? Why are parents, who want only the best for their children, seeking out food that regulators say could be dangerous? And, why are regulators and prosecutors feeling so threatened by this trend?  (Read Full Article)

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Yummy: Apple Pie in an Apple

How to Make Apple Pie in an Apple

November 12, 2012
Last updated: November 10, 2012

Leona, Teresa, Flickety, Zareen

Apple pie may be one of the most classic desserts when it comes to pies in general. But have you ever considered making one inside of the actual apple? Sounds crazy but it’s possible and a very delicious experience too. Here’s how to make these adorable pies!

Ingredients

Serves 4:

  • 4 medium apples
  • 4 tbsp white sugar
  • 2 tbsp all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • Lemon juice
  • Chilled pie dough, rolled out about 1/8 inch thick
  1. 1Preheat the oven to 350ºF/180ºC.
  2. 2Wash the apples well under cold water. Pat dry with paper towels. Set on a cutting board.
  3. 3Cut a lid into each apple, and remove the tops. With a small sharp knife, carve out the core and seeds (without piercing the bottoms of the apples).
  4. 4Using a small spoon, carefully scrape out the insides of the apple until an apple cup is formed. Save the pulp in a small bowl for the filling.
    • Rub a tiny bit of lemon juice on the insides of each apple to prevent them from turning brown.
  5. 5Dice and peel the lids very finely. Toss out the stems. Put the peeled and diced lid bits into the pulp bowl.
  6. 6Mix the sugar, flour and ground cinnamon into the apple pulp until well blended.
  7. 7Spoon the filling back into each apple. Fill about 3/4 of the way to prevent spillage of filling while baking.
  8. 8Using a cookie cutter (or knife), cut out apple lid sized circles in the dough, 1 per apple. You can also cut out shapes like leaves, flowers, stars or animals and layer each piece onto the apple to form a crust.
  9. 9Gently lay the crust circles over the apple tops and pinch the edges together much like you would a regular pie to seal the edges. Poke four little holes in the top to allow steam to come through.
  10. 10Bake on a baking sheet for 30-40 minutes or until slightly tender and crust is golden brown.
  11. 11Remove from the oven and allow to cool for about 10 minutes.
  12. 12Serve warm sprinkled with powdered sugar or cinnamon on the tops. Enjoy!
  13. 13Finished.
  • You can add additional ingredients to suit your fancy such as chopped walnuts or mix in a bit of caramel in the filling.

Things You’ll Need

  • Paper towels
  • Small spoon for scooping
  • Cutting board and knife
  • Cookie cutter (or knife)
  • Baking sheet
  • Pie dough
  • Apples

Link: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Apple-Pie-in-an-Apple

FYI: Storing Fruits & Veges

 

Eat Fruit!

 

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Nearly One Third of U.S. Food Supply Depends on Honeybees

Nearly One Third of U.S. Food Supply Depends on Honeybees | Health Freedom Alliance.

Nearly One Third of U.S. Food Supply Depends on Honeybees

Submitted by Drew Kaplan on November 30, 2011 – 10:56 am

You may have heard or read about a declining honey bee population and thought: Who cares I don’t like bees. The problem is without bees we would all go hungry very fast. If the honeybees continue to vanish this could lead to a world wide food shortage.

~Health Freedoms

Most people aren’t huge fans of bees, but without them we would go hungry pretty fast. The common honeybee pollinates 130 different crops within the U.S. alone including fruit, vegetables, and tree nuts to name a few. In the November 2011 issue of Food Technologymagazine, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), Contributing Editor and IFT President Roger Clemens and Contributing Editor Peter Pressman write that nearly one-third of the U.S. food supply requires the common honeybee to survive.

An emerging threat to the global food supply is called honeybee colony collapse disorder. Due to different viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, honeybee colonies in different parts of the world are beginning to dissipate. Without honeybee pollination, some crops like almonds, pumpkins, watermelons, and some other melons would disappear completely, (Gallai et al. 2009). In the absence of the honeybee, ingredients like vanilla spice would require manual pollination that takes additional human labor, time and money.

Article Link:  http://healthfreedoms.org/2011/11/30/nearly-one-third-of-u-s-food-supply-depends-on-honeybees/

Source: http://scienceblog.com/49513/49513/

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