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Benefits Of Cinnamon On Plants: Using Cinnamon For Pests, Cuttings, & Fungicide

By Anne Baley

Cinnamon is a wonderful flavor addition to cookies, cakes and any number of other foods, but to gardeners, it’s so much more. This versatile spice can be used to help root cuttings, to prevent fungus from killing small seedlings and even for keeping pests away from your home. Once you learn how to use cinnamon powder for plant health, you’ll think twice about grabbing harsh chemicals for your gardening needs.

Benefits of Cinnamon on Plants

The benefits of cinnamon on plants is widespread and you may end up reaching for the spice almost daily. Here are some of the most common uses of cinnamon in gardens:

Cinnamon for pests

If you have a problem with ants [1] in your home or greenhouse, cinnamon is a good deterrent. Ants don’t like to walk where cinnamon powder lays, so summer ant problems will be decreased.

Use cinnamon for pests inside and outside your house. Find their entryway and sprinkle cinnamon powder in the path. Cinnamon won’t kill the ants in your home, but it will help to keep them from coming inside. If you have a problem with ants in your child’s sandbox, mix a container of cinnamon powder with the sand, mixing it well. Ants will steer clear of the sand.

Cinnamon as rooting agent

Cinnamon as a rooting agent is as useful as willow water [2] or hormone rooting powder [3]. A single application to the stem when you plant the cutting will stimulate root growth in almost every plant variety.

Give your cuttings [4]a quick start with the help of cinnamon powder. Pour a spoonful onto a paper towel and roll damp stem ends in the cinnamon. Plant the stems in fresh potting soil [5]. The cinnamon will encourage the stem to produce more stems, while helping to prevent the fungus that causes damping-off disease.

Cinnamon fungicide control

Damping off disease [6] is a fungus-based problem that hits small seedlings just as they begin to grow. Cinnamon will help prevent this problem by killing the fungus. It also works with other fungal problems exhibited on older plants, such as slime mold [7] and with deterring mushrooms in planters [8].

Take advantage of cinnamon fungicide control by making a cinnamon spray for plants. Stir some cinnamon into warm water and allow it to steep overnight. Strain the liquid through a coffee filter and put the results into a spray bottle. Spray the stems and leave of affected plants, and mist the potting soil in plants that have a mushroom problem.


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A Mixture of Honey and Cinnamon Cures Most Diseases

It is Found That a Mixture of Honey and Cinnamon Cures Most Diseases

March 15, 2012

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Cinnamon and Honey; Whoever thought?

Honey is the only food on the planet that will not spoil or rot. What it will do is what some call ‘turning to sugar’. In reality, Honey is always Honey. However, when left in a cool dark place for a long time it will “crystallize”. When this happens loosen the lid, boil some water and sit the Honey container in the hot water, but turn off the heat and let it liquefy naturally. It is then as good as it ever was. Never boil Honey or put it in a microwave. This will kill the enzymes in the Honey.

Cinnamon and Honey

Bet the drug companies won’t like this one getting around. Facts on Honey and Cinnamon: It is found that a mixture of Honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also accept Honey as a ‘Ram Ban’ (very effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without side effects for any kind of diseases.
Today’s science says that even though Honey is sweet, when it is taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm even diabetic patients. Researched by western scientists:  (READ FULL ARTICLE)

Benefits of cinnamon – surprising health facts

Benefits of cinnamon – surprising health facts.

naturalnews.com 2011
Benefits of cinnamon – surprising health facts
by Tara Green

(NaturalNews) A shaker of cinnamon often sits on the spice rack in most of our kitchens. Given its frequent use in sugary baked goods, many health mavens overlook cinnamon’s centuries-old history as a healing substance, focusing on more exotic herbs rather than a brown powder found in Grandma’s kitchen. Yet cinnamon, derived from the bark of a tree commonly found in South Asia and the Middle East region, not only adds flavor to pies, it also delivers a host of health benefits.

Ancient India’s Healing Tradition

Ayurveda, the ancient healing system of India, often uses cinnamon to stimulate circulation as well as to increase the bio-availability of other herbs. Ayurvedic healers, prescribe remedies based on an individual’s dosha or type. Ayurveda sees cinnamon as an appropriate remedy for people who belong to the kapha type (characterized as sturdy, heavy, calm, slow and moist) and the vata type (thin, cold, prone to nervousness) since cinnamon tends to have a heating and energizing effect. People who belong to the pitta type (fiery, oily, sharp) can partake of cinnamon in moderation.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

Herbalists and acupuncturists in the Chinese tradition value cinnamon for its warming qualities. Doctors of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) may prescribe cinnamon, often in combination with another warming substance such as ginger, to ward off colds. TCM healers may prescribe cinnamon for disorders associated with the kidney meridian. (Read Full Article)

A favorite Michelle Obama snack: Exclusive access into White House kitchen – Yahoo! News

A favorite Michelle Obama snack: Exclusive access into White House kitchen – Yahoo! News.
A favorite Michelle Obama snack: Exclusive access into White House kitchen By Dominique Dawes dominique Dawes Fri May 20, 9:38 am ET

Last summer I had the privilege of hosting one of the First Lady’s Let’s Move South Lawn series.  The focus was on educating and engaging children on the importance of physical activity and proper nutrition. Around 60 kids from the DC area were able to run, skip and hop in the backyard of one of the most famous homes in the world. After an hour of participating in physical activity stations, we were all ready for a good snack. And this is when I tried the fruit and oat bars.

Here’s the recipe:  Fruit and Oatmeal Bars

Time:
About 50 minutes, plus time cooling

Ingredients:

* 6 tablespoons grapeseed oil, or other neutral oil, plus extra for brushing pan
* 2 cups rolled oats
* ½ cup mixed seeds, such as pumpkin, sunflower and sesame
* ½ cup honey
* ½ cup dark brown sugar
* 1/3 cup maple syrup
* Pinch of salt
* 1 ½ cups mixed dried fruit, such as raisins, cherries, apricots, papaya, pineapple and cranberries (at least 3 kinds, cut into small pieces if large)
* 1 teaspoon ground cardamom or cinnamon
* 2 tablespoons of butter

Directions:

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 9-inch-square baking pan with parchment paper or foil, letting a few inches hangs over side of pan. Brush with oil

2. Spread oats and seeds on another baking pan and toast in oven just until golden and fragrant, 6 to 8 minutes, shaking pan once.

3. In a saucepan, combine oil, butter, honey, brown sugar, maple syrup and salt. Stir over medium heat until smooth and hot. In a mixing bowl, toss together toasted oats and seeds, dried fruit and cardamom. Pour hot sugar mixture over and stir until well combined.

4. While mixture is warm, transfer to prepared pan, pressing into pan evenly with an offset spatula.

5. Bake until brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer pan to a rack and let cool completely. Using the overhanging foil or paper, lift out of pan and place on a work surface Cut into bars, about 1 ½ inches by 3 inches.

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