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Protect the Dietary Guidelines

Margo Wootan, CSPI <actionalert@cspinet.org>
To:halimahbwwe@yahoo.com
Mar 23 at 1:46 PM
 Americans deserve nutrition advice based on sound science
Center for Science in the Public Interest
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Protect the Dietary Guidelines
TAKE ACTION
Dear Halimah,


The food and beverage industry has long attacked nutrition science. Now it has the Trump administration to back it up.

Every five years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services convene top scientists to review the evidence and update the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Those Guidelines are used by health professionals to give nutrition advice and are the basis for national, state, and local nutrition policies. For example, they are the underpinning for school meals that include more whole grains, fruits, and vegetables and less salt and saturated fat.

But if the Trump Administration omits or weakens any of those recommendations in the 2020 Guidelines, you can expect whole grains, fruits, and vegetables in school meals to dwindle and salt, sugar, and saturated fat to climb. And that’s what may happen.

TAKE ACTION
In a move that should please industry giants, the administration is attempting to narrow the scope of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Its current proposal ignores salt entirely. And it’s not clear how carefully it will look at whole grains, fruits, vegetables, saturated fat, and sugars.

I need your help.  Please join CSPI in urging USDA and HHS not to gut the Guidelines. Our children need healthy school meals. All Americans deserve nutrition advice built on complete and sound science.

Sincerely,

MARGO WOOTANMargo G. Wootan
Vice President for Nutrition
Center for Science in the Public Interest

FYI: Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)

FYI

Delta Recalls Strollers Due to Fall Hazard

The stroller leg bracket can break, posing a fall hazard to infants in the stroller.

https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/delta-recalls-strollers

Full Recall Information — https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/delta-recalls-strollers

The recall news you selected is from a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.

 

5 Ways You Can Eat Healthy On The Cheap | Rodale’s Organic Life

FOODS_RODALESSource: 5 Ways You Can Eat Healthy On The Cheap | Rodale’s Organic Life

 For variety, add something different to each meal, like a handful of nuts over your rice, or a drizzle of teriyaki sauce over your veggies. Toward the end of the week, cut up your remaining chicken and add to a sandwich with fresh lettuce and tomato.

Ditch Processed Junk Food

It might be easy to grab a snack from the vending machine or even a seemingly healthy chopped salad from a deli. But those foods are often high in calories, excess sodium, added sugar, saturated (and even trans) fats, and additives. Not to mention the costs add up. Instead, make your own trail mix to keep on hand. You’ll spend a little bit more upfront on dried fruits and nuts, but you won’t have to shell out $2 to $3 every afternoon for a snack. And you have control over what goes into your body.

Buy in Bulk

Often, buying in bulk will save you money and keep your pantry stocked with healthy foods. Keep a stockpile of nuts, dried fruit, rolled oats, seeds, and beans on hand for Sunday meal prep.

Related: Foods You Should Buy in Bulk

Make Produce Your Friend

A prepared salad can be expensive. At a nice restaurant, it can run you $15. At a make-your-own salad joint, it could be $10 or $11. For less than $2, you can buy a head of Romaine lettuce, which will give you 10 to 12 cups of chopped lettuce. A pound of bell peppers? Just a few bucks and will last you all week.

You can also head to the freezer and canned aisles:

Frozen Vegetables
When veggies are frozen just after picking, they retain their nutrients (and are cheaper and convenient). Skip those with sauces and seasoning—they’re high in added sugar and salt.

Canned Vegetables 
Choose low-sodium or no-salt-added for a nutritious, easy way to add veggies to stir-fry or as a side.

Frozen Fruit
Just like veggies, you can get nutritious fruit from the freezer aisle. Add to a smoothie, or thaw and toss in pancake batter or yogurt.

Canned Fruit
Depending on the season, canned may be cheaper than fresh fruit. Watch out for fruit packaged in heavy syrup or artificial sweeteners. Instead, look for brands that are packed in water or their own juice.

 Try Meatless Monday

Even if you‘re planning your meals in advance (see my first tip!), opting to go meatless one night a week can save money (and time!). That doesn’t mean you’ll miss out on much-needed protein to help your muscles recover. Eggs, dairy, and plant-based protein like beans and lentils are good, fairly inexpensive options. Try a veggie omelet one night or make a batch of lentils and toss in a green salad for lunch.

The article 5 Ways You Can Eat Healthy on the Cheap originally appeared on Runner’s World.

Mother Nature: “Waste Not..Please!”

Japan To Dump Radioactive Waste From Fukushima Disaster Into Pacific Ocean

By Amanda Froelich (July 15, 2017)

The head company responsible for cleaning up the Fukushima disaster plans on dumping 580 barrels of water tainted with tritium — a radioactive form of hydrogen — into the Pacific Ocean.

Though it is well-established that the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster is a detriment to human health, wildlife and the environment, the head company responsible for the Fukushima clean-operation, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), is intent on dumping water tainted with tritium — a radioactive form of hydrogen — into the Pacific Ocean. Presently, there are about 580 barrels of the radiative water which were used to cool the nuclear plant’s damaged reactors.

According to The Independent, the company’s decision to dump tainted water from Fukushima’s triple meltdown has outraged locals and citizens around the globe. Despite the fierce outcry, Takashi Kawamura, chairman of TEPCO, declared: “The decision has already been made.” However, TEPCO is not legally allowed to release the nearly 777,000 tons of radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean until the government gives the final approval. “We cannot keep going if we do not have the support of the state,” said Mr. Kawamura.

Among those infuriated by the proposal to dump tritium-tainted water into the ocean are fishermen, who say the decision will affect their livelihoods. Kanji Tachiya, head of a local fishermen’s cooperative, for instance, told the press: “Releasing (tritium) into the sea will create a new wave of unfounded rumors, making our efforts all for naught.”

TEPCO claims tritium is of little danger to humans unless exposed to high quantities. Said NRA chairman Tanaka, the chemical is “so weak in its radioactivity it won’t penetrate plastic wrapping.” Oceanagrapher Simon Boxall, who works at the University of Southhampton, agreed. He told The Guardian, “In the broad scale of things, if they do end up putting the material in the Pacific, it will have minimal effect on an ocean basin scale.”

Whether or not the water harms wildlife is questionable, but of more concern, it seems, to environmental activists is the potential that similar practices may become more common. “They say that it will be safe because the ocean is large so it will be diluted, but that sets a precedent that can be copied, essentially permitting anyone to dump nuclear waste into our seas,” said Aileen Mioko-Smith of Green Action Japan. Considering radiation from Fukushima crippled two robots in the past, some believe there is cause for concern.

What are your thoughts? Please comment your thoughts below and share this news!

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Strawberries Top List of Fruits With Most Pesticides!

This Fruit Tops ‘Dirty Dozen’ List — Again

Healthy Living

Ranking the 12 fruits and veggies most likely to be contaminated

by Cheryl Bond-Nelms, AARP, July 11, 2017|

Getty Images

For the second year in a row strawberries top the ‘Dirty Dozen’ list.

Fruits and vegetables are important to a healthy diet, but the annual report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) that ranks fruits and vegetables based on levels of pesticides may leave you confused about what is healthiest to eat.

AARP Membership: Join or Renew for Just $16 a Year

The EWG list is called the Dirty Dozen and includes fruits and vegetables considered “dirty” because of high levels of pesticide residue. At the top of the list? Strawberries, for the second year in a row.

The Dirty Dozen:

Strawberries
Apples
Nectarines

Peaches
Celery
Grapes

Cherries
Spinach
Tomatoes

Bell Peppers
Cherry Tomatoes
Cucumbers

The U.S. Department of Agriculture found that nearly 30 percent of strawberries tested contained the residue of more than 10 pesticides, and the dirtiest were linked to 21 pesticides.

Rinsing fruits and vegetables thoroughly before eating used to be the best advice, but the EWG report also states that strawberries were “most likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues even after they are picked, rinsed in the field and washed before eating.”

Although the statistics sound unnerving, the USDA states that “overall pesticide chemical residues found on the foods tested are at levels below the tolerances established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and do not pose a safety concern.”

Also, the EWG report doesn’t contain all bad news. The good news is a list of fruits and vegetables considered lower in pesticide contamination — the Clean Fifteen list.

The Clean Fifteen:

Avocados
Sweet Corn
Pineapples

Cabbage
Frozen Sweet Peas
Onions

Asparagus
Mangoes
Papayas

Kiwi
Eggplant
Honeydew Melon

Grapefruit
Cantaloupe
Cauliflower

Only 1 percent of the avocado samples tested positive for pesticide residue. And not one of the samples from the clean list tested positive for more than four types of pesticides, while a large percentage of pineapples, papayas, mangoes, kiwi and cantaloupes were found to have no detectable pesticide residue.

Still concerned? Experts suggest buying organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible as well as purchasing produce at your local farmers market.

Also of Interest

Good reason to eat more fruit
TELL US: Will ‘dirtiest’ fruits and veggies change your choices?
WATCH: Vegetables with curry dip

Source: Strawberries Top List of Fruits With Most Pesticides – AARP

Follow the Harrowing Story of the Health Care Bill in AARP’s New Video Adaptation! Watch Here

Spice Up Your Garden

Gardening Know How – https://www.gardeningknowhow.com

FOODS_CINNAMON8

Benefits Of Cinnamon On Plants: Using Cinnamon For Pests, Cuttings, & Fungicide

By Anne Baley

Cinnamon is a wonderful flavor addition to cookies, cakes and any number of other foods, but to gardeners, it’s so much more. This versatile spice can be used to help root cuttings, to prevent fungus from killing small seedlings and even for keeping pests away from your home. Once you learn how to use cinnamon powder for plant health, you’ll think twice about grabbing harsh chemicals for your gardening needs.

Benefits of Cinnamon on Plants

The benefits of cinnamon on plants is widespread and you may end up reaching for the spice almost daily. Here are some of the most common uses of cinnamon in gardens:

Cinnamon for pests

If you have a problem with ants [1] in your home or greenhouse, cinnamon is a good deterrent. Ants don’t like to walk where cinnamon powder lays, so summer ant problems will be decreased.

Use cinnamon for pests inside and outside your house. Find their entryway and sprinkle cinnamon powder in the path. Cinnamon won’t kill the ants in your home, but it will help to keep them from coming inside. If you have a problem with ants in your child’s sandbox, mix a container of cinnamon powder with the sand, mixing it well. Ants will steer clear of the sand.

Cinnamon as rooting agent

Cinnamon as a rooting agent is as useful as willow water [2] or hormone rooting powder [3]. A single application to the stem when you plant the cutting will stimulate root growth in almost every plant variety.

Give your cuttings [4]a quick start with the help of cinnamon powder. Pour a spoonful onto a paper towel and roll damp stem ends in the cinnamon. Plant the stems in fresh potting soil [5]. The cinnamon will encourage the stem to produce more stems, while helping to prevent the fungus that causes damping-off disease.

Cinnamon fungicide control

Damping off disease [6] is a fungus-based problem that hits small seedlings just as they begin to grow. Cinnamon will help prevent this problem by killing the fungus. It also works with other fungal problems exhibited on older plants, such as slime mold [7] and with deterring mushrooms in planters [8].

Take advantage of cinnamon fungicide control by making a cinnamon spray for plants. Stir some cinnamon into warm water and allow it to steep overnight. Strain the liquid through a coffee filter and put the results into a spray bottle. Spray the stems and leave of affected plants, and mist the potting soil in plants that have a mushroom problem.


Article printed from Gardening Know How: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com

URL to article: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/using-cinnamon-on-plants.htm

 

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Lead in Food

Lead in Food: A Hidden Health Threat

Moms Clean Air Force

BY ON June 15, 2017

Our core issues are air pollution and climate change, but in our work to protect children’s health we were surprised to learn that food is a source of young children’s exposure to lead.

New research from Environmental Defense Fund, our parent organization, explores the problem of lead in baby food. We are reposting their article about the research here in full because we think it’s so important. No safe level of lead has been identified. Even very low blood lead levels can lead to behavioral problems and lower IQ.

Lead has no place in a child’s diet! Please call the customer service number of the company that makes your baby food. FDA allowable levels are not good enough.

Here’s what you can say: “I don’t want lead in my baby’s food – no matter what FDA says is permissible. Can you assure me that you have tested your food for lead and that it meets the guidelines laid out by the American Academy of Pediatrics for no more than 1 ppb of lead?”


Food is a meaningful – and surprising – source of young children’s exposure to lead.

No safe level of lead in blood has been identified. In children, even very low blood lead levels can cause behavioral problems and lower IQ. Protecting children’s ability to learn and thrive demands that we find effective ways to reduce exposures to lead from all sources.

EDF analyzed 11 years of data from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and found that food, and baby food in particular, is a meaningful – and surprising – source of lead. If it were eliminated completely, we estimate the societal benefits at more than $27 billion annually.

Key findings

EDF‘s analysis of 11 years of FDA data found:

  • Lead was detected in 20% of baby food samples compared to 14% for other foods.
  • Eight types of baby foods had detectable lead in more than 40% of samples.
  • Baby food versions of apple and grape juices and carrots had more samples with detectable lead than the regular versions.

EDF also found that more than 1 million children consume more lead than FDA’s limit. Eliminating lead in food would save society more than $27 billion annually in total lifetime earnings from saved IQ points.

What we did

EDF evaluated data collected and analyzed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 2003 to 2013 as part of the agency’s Total Diet Study (TDS). Since the 1970s, the TDS has tracked metals, pesticides, and nutrients in food. While we evaluated all types of food collected by FDA, we focused on types of baby food because infants are most vulnerable to lead.

What we found

Overall, 20% of 2,164 baby food samples and 14% of the other 10,064 food samples had detectable levels of lead. At least one sample in 52 of the 57 types of baby food analyzed by FDA had detectable levels of lead in it. Lead was most commonly found in the following baby foods types:

  • Fruit juices: 89% of grape juice samples contained detectable levels of lead, mixed fruit (67%), apple (55%), and pear (45%)
  • Root vegetables: Sweet potatoes (86%) and carrots (43%)
  • Cookies: Arrowroot cookies (64%) and teething biscuits (47%)

We also found that the baby food versions of apple and grape juice and of carrots had samples with detectable lead more often than the regular versions.

Juice with detectable level of lead

Recommendations

Both FDA and food producers can and must do better to reduce lead in food, especially baby food.

EDF recommends that FDA:

  • Ensure lead is not added to any food contact material where it is reasonably expected to get into food;
  • Make clear that the international standards for fruit juice are inadequate;
  • Update its limits and food safety guidance to reflect current scientific understanding of lead risks that better protect children; and
  • Encourage manufacturers to reduce lead levels in food and take enforcement action when limits are exceeded.

Manufacturers need not wait for FDA to act. EDF recommends companies:

  • Set a goal of less than 1 ppb of lead in baby food and other foods marketed to young children;
  • Continue to prioritize lead contaminant minimization when sourcing ingredients;
  • Test more frequently during processing to identify additional sources of lead and take appropriate corrective actions; and
  • Publicly commit to consumers to drive down lead levels through health-protective limits and robust product stewardship.

In the meantime, parents of young children should consult with their child’s pediatrician to learn about all the ways to reduce lead exposure. They should also check with their favorite brands to ask whether the company:

  • Regularly tests its products for lead; and
  • Ensures that, especially for baby food, there is less than 1 ppb of lead in the food and juices they sell.

Healthy eating requires safe, nutritious food. (Tweet this) Lead has no place in a child’s diet.

Download the report [PDF]

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TOPICS: Children’s Health, Politics, Toxics

US RECALL NEWS

Conagra Brands Recalls Hunt’s Chili Kits Due To Potential Presence Of Salmonella In Spice Packet

APRIL 2, 2017
BY THE FDA LEAVE A COMMENT

FOODS_RECALL_HUNTS

Conagra Brands, Inc., announced today it is voluntarily recalling a limited amount of Hunt’s Chili Kits due to the potential presence of Salmonella in the chili seasoning packet contained in the kit. The chili seasoning used in the packet originated from a supplier who informed the company of the potential presence of Salmonella in a raw material used in the chili seasoning. Although no Salmonella was found in the finished product supplied to Conagra Brands, the company has decided out of an abundance of caution to recall the product.

There have been no reports of adverse reactions or injuries due to consumption of this product to date. Salmonella is a bacterium that can cause diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. Most individuals recover without treatment. In some cases, diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. The elderly, infants and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

The product covered by this recall was distributed in retail stores, military commissaries and online nationwide in the U.S.; the specific product information is listed below. The product code information is stated on the bottom of the kit below the barcode. No other Hunt’s products or Conagra Brands’ products are impacted by this recall.

Item Description UPC MFG/Lot Code Best By Date

HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534619500 Apr 04, 2018
HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534622200 May 01, 2018
HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534619600 Apr 05, 2018

Consumers who have purchased this item are advised not to consume it and return it to the store where originally purchased. Conagra Brands is cooperating with the FDA on this recall and is working with customers to ensure the packages are removed from store shelves and are no longer distributed. Consumers with questions should call our Consumer Affairs hotline at 1-800-921-7404, open 9 am through 5 pm CDT, Monday through Friday.

Link:  https://www.usrecallnews.com/conagra-brands-recalls-hunts-chili-kits-due-to-potential-presence-of-salmonella-in-spice-packet/

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