FYI: PEARL MILLET

Pearl Millet
50 Ways To Eat Millet
by Alina Paul

FOODS_MILLET
What? Birdseed? Surely not? Yes, I really do mean millet. Rich in protein, vitamin B, iron and calcium yet free from glutens, why would you only let birds eat it? Some of us may have already discovered millet’s many virtues, and that was long before Angelina Jolie decided to tuck into it as part of her ‘ancient grains’ diet. Who knows whether it’s making her skin glow or crunching her calories, but one thing for sure is that it is ancient. It’s believed to be one of the earliest domesticated plants cultivated by the Chinese before rice and the discovery of a bowl of millet noodles dating back 4,000 years proves its Neolithic origins. Which begs the question, why was it then sidelined by rice despite having up to 30 times more calcium and twice the amount of vitamin B? Could it be down to the dearth of recipes or its taste? That’s what I set out to test.

Millet certainly can’t be accused of being monotone. There are more than 12 types from foxtail and finger (named after the shape of the mature cereal head) to proso and pearl millet. Okay, so we’re not going to be seduced by quirky names – what else has it to offer? Mothers from Mali to Mumbai swear by it as baby porridge and finger millet in particular is packed with calcium (3 times more than milk). It’s also a natural antioxidant that helps with digestion. But porridge is probably the least exciting way to eat millet – though perfectly enjoyable when mixed with raisins and mashed banana as my 3 and 5 year olds can confirm.

I wanted more from millet so I stocked up on organic millet flakes, flour and grains. Buying these online was easy and many health food stores stock them too. But why don’t we see millet sitting next to couscous or quinoa on supermarket shelves? Surely they could serve as a noble alternative to the better known and widely used couscous. Armed with inspirational nuggets from food bloggers across the world, I have been left rather perplexed as to why this tasty grain has been so unloved and unexplored by us.  (READ FULL ARTICLE)

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1 Comment

  1. roberthenryfischat said,

    June 3, 2014 at 9:34 am

    Reblogged this on robert's space and commented:
    sourghum.


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