DOZENS of Food Crops Treated with Pre-Harvest Roundup

DOZENS of Food Crops Treated with Pre-Harvest Roundup (it’s not just wheat!)
by Sarah Green Living

ENVIRONS_ROUND-UP7.jpg
Glyphosate spraying Pre-harvest application of herbicides as a (toxic) drying agent on wheat is an established practice on many conventional farms. The method was first suggested as early as 1980, becoming routine in North America over the past 15 years or so. Use is also widespread in the UK.

Applying herbicides like Roundup 7-10 days before harvest is viewed as especially helpful for wheat that ripens unevenly, a common occurrence. It is also considered a helpful tool to initiate an earlier harvest when weather conditions threaten plant viability. Other benefits are earlier ripening for earlier replanting and reducing the green material in the field. This puts less strain on farm machinery during harvest.

Farmers euphemistically call the practice “desiccation”. When used during wheat harvest, it can result in slightly greater yield by triggering plants to release more seeds.

The result? Most non-organic wheat in North America is now contaminated with glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup and similar herbicides.
WHO: Glyphosate a Probable Carcinogen

A March 2015 report by the World Health Organization identified glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen. Several EU countries have banned it as a result with more in the works.

However, in North America, glyphosate use shockingly continues to remain a popular farming tool.

And, as it turns out, use of Roundup as a drying agent on wheat prior to harvest is just the tip of the iceberg.

Dozens of other food crops are subjected to glyphosate dousing prior to harvest as well.
But Wait! Isn’t Roundup Just for GMO Crops?

It is well known that Roundup is sprayed directly on GMO crops like corn and soy because they are genetically engineered to withstand the toxic onslaught without withering. So much Roundup is used on GMO crops, in fact, that herbicide-resistant “superweeds” are now a huge problem little more than a decade later (1).

“If Roundup kills plants that aren’t genetically modified to resist it, then why use it on nonGMO crops?”

“Wouldn’t glyphosate kill a nonGMO crop?”

“Why would a farmer do this?”

Indeed, these common consumer questions indicate the ultimate irony of using Roundup for desiccation purposes on a food crop producing farm. Killing the crop and/or the greenery around it is actually the whole idea. For crops like wheat, it evens up the field, allows for an earlier harvest, protects machinery and/or increases profit.

The  Bottom Line?

Pre-harvest treatment of crops with glyphosate helps farmers to harvest their crops more efficiently and at less cost (2)

Crazy as it may seem, Roundup is used everywhere in the North American conventional food supply and not just on GMO crops or to kill weeds!

Glyphosate is applied directly to dozens of nonGMO food crops, in many cases, right before they are harvested. This is the worst possible time to apply a herbicide because it causes the glyphosate to be absorbed into the food crop directly. In other words, the glyphosate can’t be washed off later as it has become part of the food. This toxin will then be ingested by those who consume it either directly as a “whole food” or via processed foods that contain it as an ingredient.

According to the Cornucopia Institute:

Ubiquitous in food production, glyphosate is used not just with row crops like corn, soybeans and wheat but also a range of fruits, nuts and veggies. Even spinach growers use glyphosate (3).

Desiccating crops with herbicides before harvest is catching on in the UK as well where summers are wet and crops may ripen ripen slowly and unevenly. This can potentially lead to reduced yields and a lower quality crop. For example, 78% of the UK oilseed rape crop (similar to canola) is desiccated before harvest, but only 4% in Germany (4).

(READ FULL ARTICLE)

11 Fake Foods You Eat All the Time

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By McKenzie Maxson July 21, 2016 |

If you pick up a block of Parmesan cheese at the grocery store, you assume it’s the good stuff, preferably from Italy. But many times it’s mixed with cheaper cheeses and sometimes wood pulp. (Now that’s something to chew on!) Larry Olmsted calls out these frauds in his book Real Food/Fake Food. Here are the biggest offenders:

1. Coffee

If you brew your own pot at home, buy your beans whole, not ground. Ground coffee often contains additives, such as wheat, barley, and even twigs (crunchy!), because it’s cheaper and harder to tell the difference in the bag.

2. Tea

Tea seems like such a wholesome drink, but some varieties are mixed with other leaves and sometimes even sawdust to make it last longer, Olmsted says.

3. Sushi

If you order a spicy salmon roll, chances are that’s not what you’re getting. Oceana, a nonprofit marine conservation group, found that 100 percent of the seafood it tested at sushi restaurants in New York was not the fish it was claimed to be.

4. Fish

Red snapper and grouper are almost always fake because they’re expensive, Olmsted says. Some of the fish sold as grouper couldn’t be identified when tested. Ew.

5. Extra-virgin olive oil

There’s no use splurging on the good stuff. Even though it’s marketed as “pure,” EVOO is often stripped of many nutrients and diluted with peanut or soybean oil, which are cheaper.

6. Parmesan cheese

The Parmesan on shelves in the U.S. is far cry from the authentic Italian kind. A recent FDA study found it tends to be cut with less expensive cheese and sometimes even wood pulp.

7. Honey

Here’s a not-so-sweet secret: There aren’t regulations on what gets called honey. Some companies mix it with high-fructose corn syrup, so make sure you read all the ingredients.

8. Dry spices

Lab tests found instances where oregano included weeds and turmeric contained corn.

9. Champagne

You’ve probably heard sparkling wine can’t be called Champagne unless it comes from the Champagne region of France. But that doesn’t stop companies from being deceptive. André still claims to be Champagne, but that bottle of booze comes from California, not France.

10. Kobe beef

The USDA is very strict about Kobe beef imports. Just 10 companies are allowed to sell the meat in the U.S. (you can see the list here). So chances are, you aren’t getting the real stuff.

11. Fruit juice

Just because a container says “pomegranate juice” doesn’t mean it only contains the one fruit. In many instances, expensive juices are mixed with cheaper ones (like apple) to cut costs, so check the label every time. If it doesn’t list percentages, don’t buy it.

Toxics and New Borns

naturalnews.com

Originally published July 21 2016

 BLACK_NATION_BC-DEATH PLAN\

Study: Toxic chemicals in makeup, plastics and other everyday products are
harming unborn babies, damaging the brain and reducing IQs

by Amy Goodrich

(NaturalNews) Most consumers generally assume that products available on the market are proven to be safe. They believe that the government would not allow any product on the market that may be harmful to their health.

Unfortunately, this is not true. Many products sold today contain toxic ingredients with very limited safety testing. A growing number of researchers now believe that a variety of chemicals found in everyday household items, such as makeup, plastics, and food containers, may pose a serious threat to the developing brain of fetuses and growing children. These chemicals may even be lowering their IQ.

In a first-of-its-kind consensus statement, called Project TENDR (Targeting Environmental Neuro-Developmental Risks), dozens of scientists, health practitioners, and children’s health advocates are calling for a more aggressive regulation.

The aim of the coalition is to protect expectant mothers, infants, and children from toxic chemicals that endanger neurodevelopment in fetuses and children of all ages.

 

A broken system

In the statement, the authors concluded that the existing system in the U.S. for evaluating scientific evidence and making health-based decisions about environmental chemicals is “fundamentally broken.”

American children are at an “unacceptable” risk of developing neurological disorders including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disabilities, and other learning and behavioral disabilities. Parents report that one in six American children have a developmental disability, which is 17 percent more than a decade ago.

These rising neurological defects are very complex disorders caused by genetic, social, and environmental factors. While we cannot change our genetic makeup, the toxic effect chemicals have on our health can, and should, be prevented.

One way pregnant women can protect their little one and build up immunity is through juicing health-promoting superfoods.

 

Chemicals are everywhere

The report gives bad press to the U.S. that continues to allow these chemicals to flood the market with little or no evidence of the effects they may have on the developing brain. With the TENDR consensus statement, the authors hope to reduce toxic chemical exposure and neurodevelopmental disabilities in America’s children.

The chemicals singled out by the coalition include lead, mercury, organophosphate pesticides used in agriculture and gardens, flame retardants, combustion-related air pollutants, and phthalates found in plastic bottles, food containers, and beauty products.

Furthermore, they note that traffic pollution and smoke from wood can also affect the neurological development of both unborn baby and growing child.

While polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been banned or restricted in America for years, the authors report that these can linger in the environment for decades and are also reason for concern.

 

Chemicals are everywhere

Professor Susan Schantz, of the University of Illinois, said that these chemicals are not only found in air and water, but also in everyday products that we use in our home or apply on our skin. Reducing the exposure is possible and urgently needed to protect our future generation.

Almost every day we come in contact with phthalates and other endocrine disruptors found in all kinds of different products. As reported by the Daily Mail, 90 percent of pregnant women in the U.S. have detectable levels of 62 different chemicals.

Many of these chemicals can interfere with the normal activity of hormones, like thyroid hormones, estrogen, and androgens. Schantz and her colleagues are studying the effects phthalates and other endocrine disruptors have on the child’s brain and behavior.

Professor Schantz said that very little is known about what these chemicals are doing to children’s neurological development.

“They just haven’t been studied.”, Schantz said. She expressed that if it looks like something is a risk, many scientists feel policymakers should be willing to make a decision that the chemical could be trouble and we need to stop its production or limit its use. Professor Schantz went on to say, “We shouldn’t have to wait 10 or 15 years — allowing countless children to be exposed to it in the meantime — until we’re positive it’s a bad actor.”

Sources for this article include:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP358/
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160701093942.htm
http://huromslowjuicers.naturalnews.com/huromslowjuicers.html

 

Uses: Apple Cider Vinegar

FYI: A Cleansing Bath

Don’t Have a Sauna? Try a Ginger Bath

by Sarah

A ginger bath is one the most beneficial and enjoyable cleansing baths to try when the weather outside turns warm and the idea of a hot bath becomes unappealing.

To be sure, detox bathing is a less important practice during the summer months due to the increased sweating of the body during the day which serves to facilitate the release of toxins and impurities.

However, it is still a good idea to continue the habit at least once every week or so to keep the detoxification channels open particularly if you are stuck in an air conditioned environment most of the day.

If you’ve never tried a ginger bath before, you will be happy to know that it is best enjoyed in lukewarm rather than hot water, which is why it’s perfect to try when the weather outside is sultry and humid.

The Benefits of Ginger

If you’ve ever eaten a dish or beverage made with ginger, you have no doubt observed that it has an immediate and very cleansing effect. Sinuses are opened up, tastebuds tingle, and an upset stomach tends to settle down in a hurry. Your face may even start to perspire slightly.

One of my favorite ways to clear congestion from a cold is a power shot which blends 2 ounces (59 ml) fresh wheatgrass and ginger juice.

Ginger is closely related to turmeric and as such is a powerful medicinal herb used for millennia by ancestral cultures. Medicinally, some of the most well known uses are for temporary relief from the nausea associated with morning sickness, the dizziness and headaches from motion sickness, or pain from menstrual cramps.

The primary reason ginger is so helpful when taken internally is due to its potent anti-inflammatory properties and encouragement of blood circulation. Numerous scientific studies since the 1970’s have verified that ginger’s phytonutrients known as gingerols exhibit strong antioxidant and anti-microbial properties on human tissues.

In one of many examples, the Journal of Medicinal Food published an article that identified ginger as an herbal medicinal product that shares pharmacological properties with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), affirming the use of red ginger as an analgesic for arthritis pain in Indonesian traditional medicine (1).

(Read Full Article:  www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/ginger-bath/

FYI: Foods v. Pesticides

– AARP – http://blog.aarp.org

Strawberries Top ‘Dirty Dozen’ List for Pesticides

FOODS_S-BERRIES

And the winner — or maybe we should say, loser — this year is … strawberries.For the first time in five years, the popular berry has ousted apples from the number one spot on the Environmental Working Group’s annual report of the produce with the most pesticide residue — aka “The Dirty Dozen.” The nonprofit group also included a “Clean 15” list of produce lowest in pesticides.

After strawberries, apples are number two, followed by nectarines, peaches, celery, grapes, cherries, spinach, tomatoes, sweet bell peppers, cherry tomatoes and cucumbers. Leafy greens, including kale and collard greens, and hot peppers also rated a mention for having worrisome insecticide residue levels.

Conventionally grown strawberries had an average of 5.75 different pesticides per sample, compared to 1.74 pesticides per sample of all the other produce the USDA tested, the environmental advocacy group reported. However, only about 7 percent of the strawberries sampled in 2014 had levels of pesticide residues considered illegal.

“Fruits and vegetables are important for your health, but for those on the Dirty Dozen, we recommend buying the organic versions if you want to avoid pesticides on your food,” Sonya Lunder, EWG senior analyst, said in a statement.

Avocados topped the Clean 15 list, with only 1 percent of samples showing any detectable pesticides.  Also on the list: sweet corn, pineapples, cabbage, frozen sweet peas, onions, asparagus, mangoes, papayas, kiwis, eggplant, honeydew melon, grapefruit, cantaloupe and cauliflower.

None of the samples of these fruits tested positive for more than four types of pesticides, and 89 percent of pineapples, 81 percent of papayas, 78 percent of mangoes, 73 percent of kiwi and 62 percent of cantaloupes had no detectable residues.

The EWG’s annual report is based on pesticide residue testing by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). According to EWG, nearly three-fourths of the nearly 7,000 produce samples tested by the USDA in 2014 — the most recent year for which data is available — contained pesticide residues, although the USDA said this year that “overall pesticide chemical residues found on the foods tested are at levels below the tolerances established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and do not pose a safety concern.” The agency noted that residues exceeding EPA tolerances were detected in only 0.36 percent of the samples tested.

“The resulting data in this year’s report gives consumers confidence that the products they buy for their families are safe and wholesome,” said Ruihong Guo, deputy administrator of the USDA’s science and technology program.

The EWG’s Lunder called the EPA’s residue levels allowed on produce “too lax to protect Americans’ health. They should be updated to reflect new research that shows even very small doses of toxic chemicals can be harmful, particularly for young children.”

 
 

 

 

It’s Here: Another Dreaded Super-Bug!

The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.
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CRE, a family of bacteria pictured in this illustration, is considered one of the deadliest superbugs because it causes infections that are often resistant to most antibiotics. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Reuters)

This post has been updated.

For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotic of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could signal “the end of the road” for antibiotics.

The antibiotic-resistant strain was found last month in the urine of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman. Defense Department researchers determined that she carried a strain of E. coli resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to a study published Thursday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. The authors wrote that the discovery “heralds the emergence of a truly pan-drug resistant bacteria.”

[Superbug known as ‘phantom menace’ on the rise in U.S.]

(READ FULL ARTICLE)

 

 

Re: Hand Sanitation

Jet Air Dryers Spread More Bacteria than Conventional Hand Dryers, Study Finds
Maverick Baker

HEALTH_hand-dryer-HAZ

The idea is that after finishing your business in the bathroom, you wash your hands with soap and water to sterilize, then stick your hands right under a jet of hot air to dry them up. But could a jet dryer put more bacteria on your hands than you initially had? Unfortunately, as it turns out, those speedy convenient jet dryers have the potential to spread thousands of bacteria.

Hand hygiene is considered to be an integral part of infection control. Infectious diseases are constantly circulating indoor settings, accumulating in dark, warm, and damp areas- like around a hand dryer. A hand dryer provides a perfect habitat that easily sustains many plaque-forming units, or

infectious virus particles- the bad stuff that makes you sick. Viruses and bacteria make home to the warm climate which is generally damp given its close proximity to the sinks and toilets.

When a hand dryer is used, it sprays the internal air (including the pathogens and viruses) all over the user’s hands as well as spreads the bacteria that has not been properly washed off.

A study concluded at the University of Westminster, London, discovered that jet air dryers are anything but convenient. Although they provide a quick method to dry off excess water, as it turns out they are equally as effective at spreading bacteria- all over your clean hands. The study determined that using a jet air dryer spread up to 60 times

the amount of bacteria compared to traditional hand dryers. That, however, is low considering jet dryers spread up to 1300 more times the bacteria than paper towel- up to an astonishing 1.65 meters away.

Bacteria can be harmful, causing nasty diseases or illnesses than can take months to get rid of. This news was especially unfortunate for Dyson’s new Airblade system. Dyson claims their product filters out 99.97% of particulate impurities the size of bacteria or viruses- an impressive claim that would surely make it seem they are more sanitary. However, as the University of Westminster discovered, jet air dryers have a much more sinister effect as the bacteria accumulate around the dryer and get dispersed upon use. So next time you are in a rush in a public bathroom, maybe stick to the traditional (but safer) alternative with paper towels.

EWG Petition Re: BPA

Tell the Senate to Label BPA

Halimah Allah,

The dangers of the toxic chemical bisphenol A are no secret.

Even tiny amounts of BPA can disrupt the endocrine system. It has been linked to a wide variety of ills, including infertility, cancer, obesity, diabetes, early puberty, behavioral changes in children and resistance to chemotherapy.

In other words, it has no place anywhere in our food or food packaging – yet it continues to be used to coat the insides of most of the 131 billion food and beverage cans made in the U.S. annually.

The good news is, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has introduced the BPA in Food Packaging Right to Know Act, a bill that would require food companies to label packaging that contains BPA.

Click here to tell your senators you have a right to know about BPA in food packaging. Tell them to support S. 821.

This important bill would not only make sure consumers know which food packages contain BPA, but also instruct the Food and Drug Administration to investigate the hazards of trace exposures to BPA through food packaging.

Last year, EWG scientists scrutinized more than 250 canned food brands and found that more than a third of them were still using BPA-based epoxy can linings for all their products.

The BPA in Food Packaging Right to Know Act would make sure American consumers know which products contain BPA and would empower the FDA to investigate and regulate it.

Tell your senators: Support S. 821, the BPA in Food Packaging Right to Know Act.

Thanks for standing with us,

Ken Cook
President, EWG

(TYH Note:  This Post Is For Information Only)

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