FYI: “Safest Travel?”

 

“Asbestos of the Sky” – The Aviation Industry’s Darkest Coverup

Image result for asbestos on a plane

 

Posted on: Tuesday, January 3rd 2017
at 5:00 am Written By: Sayer Ji, Founder
copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2017

 
The aviation industry hangs its hat on air travel being “the safest way to travel.” The truth, however, is that it has harbored a dark secret since its inception: it’s poisoning its passengers and crew due to deeply flawed aircraft design, de-prioritizing safety in favor of profit.

In flight, every crew member and passenger relies on an air supply. The assumption, of course, is that this air is filtered if not fresh. Perhaps you have sensed (and promptly dismissed) that there may be quality control issues around cabin air. The problem goes further than that, however, and astoundingly, this is not by accident but by design.

What’s more concerning is the fact that the industry has known about this completely preventable health hazard for at least 40 years, but no attempts have been made to filter this cocktail of hundreds of chemicals (including organophosphates in the same category as toxic nerve agents like Sarin) out of the cabin air before travelers are forced to breath them in. Nor has the root cause of the problem — unsafe aircraft design and the deprioritization of human safety — been effectively addressed.

A history of cabin air supply
Essentially, the problem comes from the need to supply the jet airliners with warm compressed air while flying at high altitudes. In order to do so, all planes used by commercial airlines since 1963 inject the cabin with air directly from the compressors of their jet engines in what is known as ‘bleed air.’ In the 50’s, engineers designed airplanes which pulled fresh air into the cabin, but this “modification” was deemed too costly by decision-makers at the time. As a result of poor design, every breath that the crew and passengers take today, consists of a 50/50 mix of recirculated cabin air and bleed air, the latter of which can contains a wide range of synthetic chemicals, such as tricresyl phosphate (TCP or TOCP), an organophosphate which is highly neurotoxic to humans. In fact, the World Health Organisation stated in 1990 that “Because of considerable variation among individuals in sensitivity to TOCP, it is not possible to establish a safe level of exposure” and “TOCP are therefore considered major hazards to human health.”1
And so, with the exception of single aircraft — the new Boeing 787, where cabin air is taken directly from the atmosphere with electrically powered compressors — all flights today involve a high risk of exposure to these neurotoxic chemicals. When you consider there are about 100,000 flights a day (only 5% of which occur on “safe” Boeing 787’s, with at least 1 in 100 flights experiencing a major ‘fume event,’ this amounts to the health endangerment of millions of daily passengers. Entire advocacy organizations exist which are dedicated to exposing the truth about the dangers of toxic airplane air, and pressuring the industry to initiate reform.

READ FULL ARTICLE: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/asbestos-sky-aviation-industry-s-darkest-coverup

 

‘Erin Brockovich’ Carcinogen in Tap Water of More than 200 Million Americans | EWG

‘Erin Brockovich’ Carcinogen in Tap Water of More than 200 Million Americans | @ewg | #ChemicalSafety

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In the film “Erin Brockovich,” the environmental crusader confronts the lawyer of a power company that polluted the tap water of Hinkley, Calif., with a carcinogenic chemical called chromium-6. When the lawyer picks up a glass of water, Brockovich says: “We had that water brought in ‘specially for you folks. Came from a well in Hinkley.”

The lawyer sets down the glass and says, “I think this meeting’s over.”

But almost 25 years after that real-life confrontation,[1] the conflict over chromium-6 is not over. A new EWG analysis of federal data from nationwide drinking water tests shows that the compound contaminates water supplies for more than 200 million Americans in all 50 states. Yet federal regulations are stalled by a chemical industry challenge that could mean no national regulation of a chemical state scientists in California and elsewhere say causes cancer when ingested at even extraordinarily low levels.

The standoff is the latest round in a tug-of-war between scientists and advocates who want regulations based strictly on the chemical’s health hazards and industry, political and economic interests who want more relaxed rules based on the cost and feasibility of cleanup. If the industry challenge prevails, it will also extend the Environmental Protection Agency’s record, since the 1996 landmark amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act, of failing to use its authority to set a national tap water safety standard for any previously unregulated chemical.[2]

In 2008, a two-year study by the National Toxicology Program found that drinking water with chromium-6, or hexavalent chromium, caused cancer in laboratory rats and mice.[3] Based on this and other animal studies, in 2010, scientists at the respected and influential California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment concluded that ingestion of tiny amounts of chromium-6 can cause cancer in people, a conclusion affirmed by state scientists in New Jersey and North Carolina.

The California scientists set a so-called public health goal of 0.02 parts per billion in tap water, the level that would pose negligible risk over a lifetime of consumption.[4] (A part per billion is about a drop of water in an Olympic-size swimming pool.) But in 2014, after aggressive lobbying by industry and water utilities, state regulators adopted a legal limit 500 times the public health goal.[5] It is the only enforceable drinking water standard at either the state or federal level.

 

Potentially unsafe concentrations for two-thirds of AmericaSpurred by a groundbreaking 2010 EWG investigation that found chromium-6 in the tap water of 31 cities[6] and a Senate hearing prompted by the findings, the EPA ordered local water utilities to begin the first nationwide tests for the unregulated contaminant. From 2013 to 2015, utilities took more than 60,000 samples of drinking water and found chromium-6 in more than 75 percent of them.[7] EWG’s analysis of the test data estimates that water supplies serving 218 million Americans – more than two-thirds of the population – contain more chromium-6 than the California scientists deemed safe.

(Read Full Article: Click “Source” Link Below)

Source: ‘Erin Brockovich’ Carcinogen in Tap Water of More than 200 Million Americans | EWG

Cocoa Uses

10 Creative Ways to Use Cocoa Powder

 

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Following are 10 delicious and creative ways to add cocoa – which is heralded for its numerous and wide-ranging health benefits – to your daily life this winter and beyond:

1. Cocoa-fy your coffee

Want to give your cup of joe a boost of beneficial antioxidants? Add one tablespoon of cocoa powder to a mug of hot brewed coffee and sweeten as normal. Warning: Your morning java just became even more addictive.

2. Sprinkle over fruit

Chocolate and fresh fruit are a perfect pairing. They not only complement each other flavor-wise, they’re both rich in essential vitamins and minerals. Simply sprinkle a tablespoon of cocoa powder over a bowl of nature’s candy and prepare to indulge in an even sweeter treat!

3. Boost your salads

Can’t handle the idea of another boring salad? We don’t blame you! End the monotony by adding some partially ground cocoa beans, known as nibs, to a mixture of lettuce, cabbage, cucumbers, carrots and any other veg you have in your repertoire.

4. Enhance trail mix

Those same cocoa nibs that took your salad to the next level also make an excellent addition to homemade (or store-bought) trail mix. Simply combine them with nuts, dried fruit and other tasty ingredients such as yogurt-covered raisins for a smart and satisfying snack.

5. Amp up cereal

Move over berries and banana slices. There’s a new topping in town! It’s cocoa powder, and it could be coming to a cereal bowl near you. A few tablespoons can make any morning better – and healthier, to boot!

6. Elevate your yogurt

If you’re yogurt fan (and really, who isn’t?), cocoa powder is a wonderful way to top off the tasty treat. And if you want to get creative, consider layering cocoa powder, fruit and yogurt to create a delicious, nutritious parfait.

7. Improve smoothie recipes

Gather your favorite smoothie ingredients, a few tablespoons of cocoa powder (or some nibs) and your blender. You know what comes next… a creamy, chocolatey smoothie that will leave you wanting more.

8. Make peanut butter better

Most of us would like to personally thank the culinary genius who first realized that peanut butter (or any nut butter) and chocolate are a delicious, decadent flavor combination. Add a tablespoon of cocoa powder to your creamy (or crunchy) spread and prepare to enjoy the ultimate peanut butter sandwich. And it’s okay to throw in some banana slices for good measure!

9. Make your own exfoliating scrub

Mix a tablespoon of cocoa powder with equal parts coconut oil, honey and sugar until a paste forms. Apply the blend to your face, and allow it to set for approximately 20 minutes. Gently massage your skin while you rinse off this delicious DIY mask, and kiss those dead skin cells goodbye!

10. Smell it

Trying to stave off your sweet tooth? According to Health.com, taking a quick whiff of cocoa powder may help you combat cravings for sweet treats. That’s because the scent of the stuff activates the same neurotransmitters that are stimulated during chocolate consumption.

Alarming Levels of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Found in Popular U.S Foods | Food Democracy Now

Source: Alarming Levels of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Found in Popular U.S Foods | Food Democracy Now

Alarming Levels of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Found in Popular U.S Foods

A new report by Food Democracy Now! and the Detox Project exposes shocking levels of glyphosate contamination in popular American foods, including Cheerios, Doritos, Oreos, Goldfish and Stacy’s Pita Chips.

Levels found in these product are well above the levels found by independent peer-reviewed studies which show that ultra-low levels of glyphosate can cause organ damage starting at 0.1 parts per billion (ppb). This is 1,750 times lower than what the EPA currently claims is safe. The highest levels detected were found in General Mills’ Original Cheerios, which were simply off the charts, at 1,125.3 ppb or nearly twice the level considered potentially harmful according to the latest scientific research in a single serving.

As a result, we’re calling on the EPA Inspector General to investigate the agency’s failure to properly test and regulate glyphosate, end the practice of pre-harvest spraying of Roundup as a drying agent and release ALL of the industry data submitted to federal agencies, but kept hidden from the American public as “trade secrets.”

Demand that your regulatory agencies, like the EPA, FDA and USDA protect the American people from toxic chemicals in our food, water and air! It’s time to get Monsanto’s Roundup off your plate, ban glyphosate and label GMOs! We need your help today. Every voice counts! The report can be viewed here.

FYI

health_floride

FYI: About Fluoride

fluoridealert.org
FAN’s Grocery Store Guide: 7 Ways to Avoid Fluoride in Beverages and Food
fluoridealert.org/content/grocery_guide/

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Over the past 100 years, the levels of fluoride in foods purchased at the grocery store have increased. The reason for this increase is multi-fold, and includes the mass fluoridation of water supplies in some countries, the introduction of fluoride-based pesticides, and the use of mechanical deboning processes in the meat industry.

So, how do you know which beverages and foods at the grocery store are most likely to contain elevated fluoride, and which of these products are most important to avoid? To answer these questions, FAN has produced the following seven “general rules.” The more you remember these rules when you shop, the more you will reduce your fluoride intake.

General Rule #1: The Naturally Occurring Level of Fluoride In Food & Water Is Very Low

The naturally occurring levels of fluoride in fruits, vegetables, meat, grain, eggs, milk, and fresh water supplies are generally very low (less than 0.1 ppm). There are only three exceptions to this rule that you need to know: seafood, tea, and water from deep wells all have elevated fluoride levels in the absence of human activity. Thus, besides tea, seafood, and deep well water, you don’t have to worry about mother nature adding to your fluoride intake.

General Rule #2: The More Processed a Food Is, the More Fluoride It Will Have

The fluoride level in food generally increases during industrial food-making processes. This is particularly true in countries with mass water fluoridation programs (e.g., United States), since it is common for food processors to use the public water supply to make their products. When you buy a beverage or food, therefore, think of how much industrial processing would have been required to get the product in the shape it’s in. The more processing, the more fluoride. Juice that is not made from concentrate will have less fluoride than reconstituted juice, a roast chicken breast will have less fluoride than a chicken nugget, etc, etc.

General Rule #3: We Get More Fluoride from Liquids than Solid Foods

If you have to choose between limiting your fluoride intake from beverages or limiting it from foods, you should definitely focus on limiting it from beverages. This is because we get far more fluoride from liquid, than food. If you have to choose between buying grape juice and raisins that are both contaminated with fluoride pesticide, buy the raisins and skip the juice. (READ FULL ARTICLE @:  fluoridealert.org/content/grocery_guide/ )

Tell the White House to require real testing of GMOs!

FYI: The Site that Simplifies Meal-Giving in Pressing Times – Johnny Jet

Meal Train isn’t a travel website per se, but it’s nonetheless useful tool for anyone who has loved ones far away and who can’t be close to support them during a pressing time. One of the nic…

Source: The Site that Simplifies Meal-Giving in Pressing Times – Johnny Jet

PRODUCT RECALL!

Blue Bell recalls chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream

By James Limbach A Washington, D.C., reporter for more than 30 years, Jim Limbach covers the federal agencies for ConsumerAffairs. Previously, he was a reporter and news anchor for Associated Press Broadcast Services, where he covered business and consumer news as well as space shots and other major spot news events. Read Full Bio→ Email James Limbach Phone: 866-773-0221

By James Limbach

A Washington, D.C., reporter for more than 30 years, Jim Limbach covers the federal agencies for ConsumerAffairs. Previously, he was a reporter and news anchor for Associated Press Broadcast Services, where he covered business and consumer news as well as space shots and other major spot news events.  Read Full Bio→

PhotoBlue Bell Ice Cream is recalling select products produced in its Sylacauga, Alabama plant because they were made with a chocolate chip cookie dough ingredient, supplied by a third party supplier Aspen Hills, Inc., that may potentially contain Listeria monocytogenes.

The recall comes more than a year after Blue Bell products were linked to 10 Listeria cases in four states, including three deaths in Kansas.

Consumers should not eat the recalled products and are encouraged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

(FOR ALL PRODUCTS NAMED IN THIS RECALL ARTICLE CLICK ON LINK) www.consumeraffairs.com/recalls/blue-bell-recalls-chocolate-chip-cookie-dough-ice-cream-092216.html

Listeria monocytogenes can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The products can be identified by the code date found on the bottom of the carton.  The products produced with the chocolate chip cookie dough pieces were distributed in the following ten states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

No illnesses have been reported to date, the company said.

For more information, consumers with questions may call 979-836-7977, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. CST.

Washing Our Hands of Toxins

Thursday, 08 September 2016 00:00 By Jill Richardson, OtherWords | Op-Ed

(health_handwshg: Jeff)

Some people love to hate government regulations. Many believe they’re just bureaucratic barriers that waste our time. But the Food and Drug Administration just passed a new regulation that’ll actually protect us, and may save you a few bucks and an unnecessary purchase at the store.

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who buys antibacterial soaps, you’ve been, at a minimum, duped. But more importantly, you’ve been exposed to harmful chemicals.

Antibacterial soaps sound good. After all, no one wants to imagine their hands teeming with bacteria.

We are utterly covered in microorganisms. That idea grosses us out, and some of that bacteria can make us sick. Kill them all, we think.

But in reality, we couldn’t survive without beneficial bacteria, some of which help protect our immune system. And antibacterial soaps are no better at preventing disease than regular soap and water.

If you’ve ever purchased soap based on its deadliness to bacteria, you’re a victim of false advertising. But it’s not as benign as that.

You’re also a victim of the harmful chemicals used to make those soaps — triclosan and triclocarban.

In addition to the possibility of helping develop germs that are resistant to antibiotics, evidence suggests that these two chemicals may also disrupt your hormone cycles. And it’s not just your skin. Triclosan can also be found in some toothpastes.

These chemicals continue making trouble even after they’re washed down the drain. They’re released into the environment via effluent from wastewater treatment plants or sewage sludge.

While triclocarban stays intact in the environment for several years, triclosan breaks down into cancer causing dioxins.

In light of their potential harm and lack of benefits, the FDA has finally banned them in consumer products. Although, hospitals and restaurants can still use them.

According to the regulation, corporations have a year to clean up their acts. That means that you might still find these soon-to-be banned chemicals in the store. So for the next year you should still read soap labels to avoid triclocarban and triclosan.

And when you do, keep in mind that despite evidence of their harmful effects, many companies chose not to do the right thing on their own and continued to sell products that contain both chemicals.

That’s why a government regulation acting in the public interest was necessary for us to wash our hands of these toxins.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.


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