FYI

health_floride

FYI: About Fluoride

fluoridealert.org
FAN’s Grocery Store Guide: 7 Ways to Avoid Fluoride in Beverages and Food
fluoridealert.org/content/grocery_guide/

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Over the past 100 years, the levels of fluoride in foods purchased at the grocery store have increased. The reason for this increase is multi-fold, and includes the mass fluoridation of water supplies in some countries, the introduction of fluoride-based pesticides, and the use of mechanical deboning processes in the meat industry.

So, how do you know which beverages and foods at the grocery store are most likely to contain elevated fluoride, and which of these products are most important to avoid? To answer these questions, FAN has produced the following seven “general rules.” The more you remember these rules when you shop, the more you will reduce your fluoride intake.

General Rule #1: The Naturally Occurring Level of Fluoride In Food & Water Is Very Low

The naturally occurring levels of fluoride in fruits, vegetables, meat, grain, eggs, milk, and fresh water supplies are generally very low (less than 0.1 ppm). There are only three exceptions to this rule that you need to know: seafood, tea, and water from deep wells all have elevated fluoride levels in the absence of human activity. Thus, besides tea, seafood, and deep well water, you don’t have to worry about mother nature adding to your fluoride intake.

General Rule #2: The More Processed a Food Is, the More Fluoride It Will Have

The fluoride level in food generally increases during industrial food-making processes. This is particularly true in countries with mass water fluoridation programs (e.g., United States), since it is common for food processors to use the public water supply to make their products. When you buy a beverage or food, therefore, think of how much industrial processing would have been required to get the product in the shape it’s in. The more processing, the more fluoride. Juice that is not made from concentrate will have less fluoride than reconstituted juice, a roast chicken breast will have less fluoride than a chicken nugget, etc, etc.

General Rule #3: We Get More Fluoride from Liquids than Solid Foods

If you have to choose between limiting your fluoride intake from beverages or limiting it from foods, you should definitely focus on limiting it from beverages. This is because we get far more fluoride from liquid, than food. If you have to choose between buying grape juice and raisins that are both contaminated with fluoride pesticide, buy the raisins and skip the juice. (READ FULL ARTICLE @:  fluoridealert.org/content/grocery_guide/ )

Tell the White House to require real testing of GMOs!

FYI: The Site that Simplifies Meal-Giving in Pressing Times – Johnny Jet

Meal Train isn’t a travel website per se, but it’s nonetheless useful tool for anyone who has loved ones far away and who can’t be close to support them during a pressing time. One of the nic…

Source: The Site that Simplifies Meal-Giving in Pressing Times – Johnny Jet

PRODUCT RECALL!

Blue Bell recalls chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream

By James Limbach A Washington, D.C., reporter for more than 30 years, Jim Limbach covers the federal agencies for ConsumerAffairs. Previously, he was a reporter and news anchor for Associated Press Broadcast Services, where he covered business and consumer news as well as space shots and other major spot news events. Read Full Bio→ Email James Limbach Phone: 866-773-0221

By James Limbach

A Washington, D.C., reporter for more than 30 years, Jim Limbach covers the federal agencies for ConsumerAffairs. Previously, he was a reporter and news anchor for Associated Press Broadcast Services, where he covered business and consumer news as well as space shots and other major spot news events.  Read Full Bio→

PhotoBlue Bell Ice Cream is recalling select products produced in its Sylacauga, Alabama plant because they were made with a chocolate chip cookie dough ingredient, supplied by a third party supplier Aspen Hills, Inc., that may potentially contain Listeria monocytogenes.

The recall comes more than a year after Blue Bell products were linked to 10 Listeria cases in four states, including three deaths in Kansas.

Consumers should not eat the recalled products and are encouraged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

(FOR ALL PRODUCTS NAMED IN THIS RECALL ARTICLE CLICK ON LINK) www.consumeraffairs.com/recalls/blue-bell-recalls-chocolate-chip-cookie-dough-ice-cream-092216.html

Listeria monocytogenes can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The products can be identified by the code date found on the bottom of the carton.  The products produced with the chocolate chip cookie dough pieces were distributed in the following ten states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

No illnesses have been reported to date, the company said.

For more information, consumers with questions may call 979-836-7977, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. CST.

Washing Our Hands of Toxins

Thursday, 08 September 2016 00:00 By Jill Richardson, OtherWords | Op-Ed

(health_handwshg: Jeff)

Some people love to hate government regulations. Many believe they’re just bureaucratic barriers that waste our time. But the Food and Drug Administration just passed a new regulation that’ll actually protect us, and may save you a few bucks and an unnecessary purchase at the store.

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who buys antibacterial soaps, you’ve been, at a minimum, duped. But more importantly, you’ve been exposed to harmful chemicals.

Antibacterial soaps sound good. After all, no one wants to imagine their hands teeming with bacteria.

We are utterly covered in microorganisms. That idea grosses us out, and some of that bacteria can make us sick. Kill them all, we think.

But in reality, we couldn’t survive without beneficial bacteria, some of which help protect our immune system. And antibacterial soaps are no better at preventing disease than regular soap and water.

If you’ve ever purchased soap based on its deadliness to bacteria, you’re a victim of false advertising. But it’s not as benign as that.

You’re also a victim of the harmful chemicals used to make those soaps — triclosan and triclocarban.

In addition to the possibility of helping develop germs that are resistant to antibiotics, evidence suggests that these two chemicals may also disrupt your hormone cycles. And it’s not just your skin. Triclosan can also be found in some toothpastes.

These chemicals continue making trouble even after they’re washed down the drain. They’re released into the environment via effluent from wastewater treatment plants or sewage sludge.

While triclocarban stays intact in the environment for several years, triclosan breaks down into cancer causing dioxins.

In light of their potential harm and lack of benefits, the FDA has finally banned them in consumer products. Although, hospitals and restaurants can still use them.

According to the regulation, corporations have a year to clean up their acts. That means that you might still find these soon-to-be banned chemicals in the store. So for the next year you should still read soap labels to avoid triclocarban and triclosan.

And when you do, keep in mind that despite evidence of their harmful effects, many companies chose not to do the right thing on their own and continued to sell products that contain both chemicals.

That’s why a government regulation acting in the public interest was necessary for us to wash our hands of these toxins.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.


Tyson Recalls 130,000 In Chicken Nuggets | BlackDoctor

foods_recall_tysonOh no, not the chicken nuggets! Tyson Foods has recalled more than 130,000 pounds of precooked chicken nuggets due to a concern that the product may be “contaminated with hard plastic,”…

Source: Tyson Recalls 130,000 In Chicken Nuggets | BlackDoctor

FYI Recall

By Chase Erwin
Sunday, September 4, 2016 at 01:27 PM EDT
 
 

Check your pantries for certain items in the “Little Bites” snack cake line from Entenmann’s – they could be part of a wide-reaching voluntary recall.

The company announced the recall this week after learning that some items could have been contaminated with small pieces of plastic.

At least one injury has been reported in connection with the recalled items.

Company officials say the presence of plastic was due to a manufacturing failure at an Illinois bakery.

The recall affects chocolate chip muffins, variety pack muffins, and fudge brownies with a “sell by” date between Sept. 24 and Oct. 8.

All affected products are being removed from store shelves nationwide.

Consumers who purchased the recalled items are asked to return them to place of purchase for a full refund.

Those with questions pertaining to the recall should phone 1-800-984-0989.

Link:  http://www.twcnews.com/tx/austin/news/2016/09/4/entenmann-s-recalls-little-bites-muffins-and-brownies.html

America: Food System Broken?

America And Our Broken Food System, Can It Be Healed?
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With this most unusual and divisive presidential election season heading into its final stretch, the candidates are narrowing their focus on swing states, including New Hampshire. But when they come courting voters, will they speak to issues that matter most to our families, our health, our economies and our well-being?

As a Dartmouth professor of sustainability science and a researcher who has delved deeply into some of the most pressing issues affecting our future, I believe that food is one of those topics.

Yes, food. Today’s food and farming system is complex and mixed up with many other issues of the day – immigration, climate change, resource depletion and water pollution, not to mention the obesity epidemic and its implications for health care spending and even military readiness. And yet food issues have been glaringly absent from the campaign trail.

By now, the candidates should be well aware that the United States has a broken food system. When I say “food system,” I mean the policies pertaining to how we grow food, how it winds up on our tables and all the steps in between.  (READ FULL ARTICLE)

FYI: TUMERIC POWDER RECALL!

Update: Gel Spice, Inc. Issues Expanded Recall of Ground Tumeric Powder Due to Elevated Lead Levels

FOODS_TUMERIC7

Posted: 08 Aug 2016 03:52 AM PDT

Gel Spice, Inc. is expanding its recall of ground turmeric powder to include additional brands because of elevated lead levels. Lead can accumulate in the body over time. Too much can cause health problems, including delayed mental and physical development and learning deficiencies. Pregnant women, infants and young children especially should avoid exposure to lead.

The post Update: Gel Spice, Inc. Issues Expanded Recall of Ground Tumeric Powder Due to Elevated Lead Levels appeared first on US Recall News.

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