Washing Our Hands of Toxins

Thursday, 08 September 2016 00:00 By Jill Richardson, OtherWords | Op-Ed

(health_handwshg: Jeff)

Some people love to hate government regulations. Many believe they’re just bureaucratic barriers that waste our time. But the Food and Drug Administration just passed a new regulation that’ll actually protect us, and may save you a few bucks and an unnecessary purchase at the store.

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who buys antibacterial soaps, you’ve been, at a minimum, duped. But more importantly, you’ve been exposed to harmful chemicals.

Antibacterial soaps sound good. After all, no one wants to imagine their hands teeming with bacteria.

We are utterly covered in microorganisms. That idea grosses us out, and some of that bacteria can make us sick. Kill them all, we think.

But in reality, we couldn’t survive without beneficial bacteria, some of which help protect our immune system. And antibacterial soaps are no better at preventing disease than regular soap and water.

If you’ve ever purchased soap based on its deadliness to bacteria, you’re a victim of false advertising. But it’s not as benign as that.

You’re also a victim of the harmful chemicals used to make those soaps — triclosan and triclocarban.

In addition to the possibility of helping develop germs that are resistant to antibiotics, evidence suggests that these two chemicals may also disrupt your hormone cycles. And it’s not just your skin. Triclosan can also be found in some toothpastes.

These chemicals continue making trouble even after they’re washed down the drain. They’re released into the environment via effluent from wastewater treatment plants or sewage sludge.

While triclocarban stays intact in the environment for several years, triclosan breaks down into cancer causing dioxins.

In light of their potential harm and lack of benefits, the FDA has finally banned them in consumer products. Although, hospitals and restaurants can still use them.

According to the regulation, corporations have a year to clean up their acts. That means that you might still find these soon-to-be banned chemicals in the store. So for the next year you should still read soap labels to avoid triclocarban and triclosan.

And when you do, keep in mind that despite evidence of their harmful effects, many companies chose not to do the right thing on their own and continued to sell products that contain both chemicals.

That’s why a government regulation acting in the public interest was necessary for us to wash our hands of these toxins.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.


Tyson Recalls 130,000 In Chicken Nuggets | BlackDoctor

foods_recall_tysonOh no, not the chicken nuggets! Tyson Foods has recalled more than 130,000 pounds of precooked chicken nuggets due to a concern that the product may be “contaminated with hard plastic,”…

Source: Tyson Recalls 130,000 In Chicken Nuggets | BlackDoctor

FYI Recall

By Chase Erwin
Sunday, September 4, 2016 at 01:27 PM EDT
 
 

Check your pantries for certain items in the “Little Bites” snack cake line from Entenmann’s – they could be part of a wide-reaching voluntary recall.

The company announced the recall this week after learning that some items could have been contaminated with small pieces of plastic.

At least one injury has been reported in connection with the recalled items.

Company officials say the presence of plastic was due to a manufacturing failure at an Illinois bakery.

The recall affects chocolate chip muffins, variety pack muffins, and fudge brownies with a “sell by” date between Sept. 24 and Oct. 8.

All affected products are being removed from store shelves nationwide.

Consumers who purchased the recalled items are asked to return them to place of purchase for a full refund.

Those with questions pertaining to the recall should phone 1-800-984-0989.

Link:  http://www.twcnews.com/tx/austin/news/2016/09/4/entenmann-s-recalls-little-bites-muffins-and-brownies.html

America: Food System Broken?

America And Our Broken Food System, Can It Be Healed?
FOODS_FUTURE

With this most unusual and divisive presidential election season heading into its final stretch, the candidates are narrowing their focus on swing states, including New Hampshire. But when they come courting voters, will they speak to issues that matter most to our families, our health, our economies and our well-being?

As a Dartmouth professor of sustainability science and a researcher who has delved deeply into some of the most pressing issues affecting our future, I believe that food is one of those topics.

Yes, food. Today’s food and farming system is complex and mixed up with many other issues of the day – immigration, climate change, resource depletion and water pollution, not to mention the obesity epidemic and its implications for health care spending and even military readiness. And yet food issues have been glaringly absent from the campaign trail.

By now, the candidates should be well aware that the United States has a broken food system. When I say “food system,” I mean the policies pertaining to how we grow food, how it winds up on our tables and all the steps in between.  (READ FULL ARTICLE)

FYI: TUMERIC POWDER RECALL!

Update: Gel Spice, Inc. Issues Expanded Recall of Ground Tumeric Powder Due to Elevated Lead Levels

FOODS_TUMERIC7

Posted: 08 Aug 2016 03:52 AM PDT

Gel Spice, Inc. is expanding its recall of ground turmeric powder to include additional brands because of elevated lead levels. Lead can accumulate in the body over time. Too much can cause health problems, including delayed mental and physical development and learning deficiencies. Pregnant women, infants and young children especially should avoid exposure to lead.

The post Update: Gel Spice, Inc. Issues Expanded Recall of Ground Tumeric Powder Due to Elevated Lead Levels appeared first on US Recall News.

THEY SAY “NO GMO!”

First Scotland Then Germany Now Greece Has Kicked Out Monsanto As GMO Bans Sweep Through Europe  http://www.healthfreedoms.org/first-scotland-then-germany-now-greece-has-kicked-out-monsanto-as-gmo-bans-sweep-through-europe/

FOODS_GMO-NO2

First Scotland and Germany booted GMOs from their countries, citing fear of GMO crops contaminating their food supplies and concern over putting their food and beverage industries in jeopardy. Now, Greece and Latvia are telling Monsanto exactly what they can do with their genetically modified crops. The tide is turning. A tipping point just became evident through the actions of two additional European countries who have had enough of the Biotech strong arm.

Latvia and Greece have opted out of GMOs, as are Germany and Scotland, as part of the new allowances indicated in legislation that recently passed for EU countries.

The geographical opt-outs specifically target Monsanto’s MON810 GM Maize, which countries may choose to grow or refuse in the next several months. This is currently the only genetically modified crop allowed to be grown within the EU at present – but only when countries give specific permission.

As Sustainable Pulse explains, “while the European Commission is responsible for approvals, requests to be excluded also have to be submitted to the company making the application i.e. Monsanto for MON810.”

If additional member states deny Monsanto, we can be assured that the biotech company will try to find other ways to force their GM crops on the world (e.g. the Trans Pacific Trade partnership) but as we collectively say NO, upholding bans, and demanding labeling, we will rid this planet of the plague that is genetically modified food.

Source(s):

getholistichealth.com
reuters.com
naturalsociety.com
sustainablepulse.com
politicalvelcraft.org

Food Budjet

When Your Food Budget Is Critical
http://www.stretcher.com/stories/13/13aug05f.cfm

A Family Food Crisis

FOODS_BUDGETING2

Going Beyond Cheap Recipes to Reduce Grocery Bills
—————————————————————
“My problem is beyond frugal!

I only have $100 to feed my family of three for the next month.
I’m not a great cook and just don’t know what to do. Can you help
me to get through the month without starving my family?”

Jana
—————————————————————
Your problem may be beyond normal frugal living standards, but it’s not unsolvable. And, many common frugal shopping tips can help you keep your family from starving this month. Let’s examine a few.

Begin by checking your existing inventory. You may not have a lot of food in the house, but you’ll want to use everything that you do have.

If you’re not sure how to use some of the things on your pantry shelf, check out recipe sites. Most will allow you to put in ingredients and they’ll return a list of recipes that use them.

Don’t worry about not being an excellent chef. Recipes sites have articles and videos covering any cooking skill you’ll need.

Next, consider other sources for food besides the grocery store. Many are need based so you’ll have to admit that you want help. There’s no shame in that. Almost all of us have struggled at one time or another.

Find out about local food pantries. Most contain a variety of staples. If you don’t know of any in your community, check with a local church. They should be able to provide contact information.
One Hundred Dollar Plate photo from Shutterstock

Depending on your income level, government assistance might be available. SNAP (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program), commonly called “food stamps,” is meant to help families who need help with groceries. You’ll find more information on their webpage.

Contact your children’s school. You’ll find lunch assistance programs available. An added bonus is that most school lunches are well balanced, which should make your job easier.

It’s also possible that you might be able to work for some food. That might sound strange, but it can’t hurt to ask at local fruit/veggie stands and farms. Also ask them what they do with produce that’s overripe and can’t be sold.

One big key to your success is meal planning. You’ll want to select recipes that allow you to use whatever inventory you have and don’t require you to buy expensive ingredients. Stick to simple recipes.

When you do go to the grocery store, stay away from processed foods. Whole potatoes are cheaper than the instant mashed ones. The closer foods are to their natural state the cheaper they will be.

Basic food is relatively inexpensive, especially beans and starches. A five-pound bag of rice can be the basis for many meals for pennies. Sticking to the basics will stretch your food dollar.

If your spending has put you in debt, take the first step to financial freedom!

Expect to have some meatless meals. Look for markdowns when you do buy meat. And only buy cuts that you can spread across multiple meals.

Use beans to provide protein for your meals. Raw beans are inexpensive and not that hard to cook. Check the web for “how to” videos.

Take advantage of in-season vegetables. They provide good nutrition. Often they’re flavorful. And, if they’re locally grown, they can be found very cheaply.

Blend in some soup or salad meals. A head of lettuce along with a tomato and a bit of salad dressing makes an acceptable meal.

Make sure that nothing you buy goes to waste. Whether it’s the last few pieces of meat or a half of a potato, make sure you use it before it spoils.

You’re facing a tough challenge, but not an impossible one. For the next month, your menu options may be limited, but your family need not go hungry. You’ll pick up some frugal living skills that will continue to save you money.

Gary Foreman is a former financial planner and purchasing manager who founded The Dollar Stretcher.com website and newsletters in 1996. He’s been featured in MSN Money, Yahoo Finance, Fox Business, The Nightly Business Report, US News Money and CreditCards.com. Gary shares his philosophy of money here. You can follow Gary on Twitter or visit Gary Foreman on Google+. Gary is also available for audio, video or print interviews. For more info see his media page.

Take the Next Step: (http://www.stretcher.com/stories/13/13aug05f.cfm)

DOZENS of Food Crops Treated with Pre-Harvest Roundup

DOZENS of Food Crops Treated with Pre-Harvest Roundup (it’s not just wheat!)
by Sarah Green Living

ENVIRONS_ROUND-UP7.jpg
Glyphosate spraying Pre-harvest application of herbicides as a (toxic) drying agent on wheat is an established practice on many conventional farms. The method was first suggested as early as 1980, becoming routine in North America over the past 15 years or so. Use is also widespread in the UK.

Applying herbicides like Roundup 7-10 days before harvest is viewed as especially helpful for wheat that ripens unevenly, a common occurrence. It is also considered a helpful tool to initiate an earlier harvest when weather conditions threaten plant viability. Other benefits are earlier ripening for earlier replanting and reducing the green material in the field. This puts less strain on farm machinery during harvest.

Farmers euphemistically call the practice “desiccation”. When used during wheat harvest, it can result in slightly greater yield by triggering plants to release more seeds.

The result? Most non-organic wheat in North America is now contaminated with glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup and similar herbicides.
WHO: Glyphosate a Probable Carcinogen

A March 2015 report by the World Health Organization identified glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen. Several EU countries have banned it as a result with more in the works.

However, in North America, glyphosate use shockingly continues to remain a popular farming tool.

And, as it turns out, use of Roundup as a drying agent on wheat prior to harvest is just the tip of the iceberg.

Dozens of other food crops are subjected to glyphosate dousing prior to harvest as well.
But Wait! Isn’t Roundup Just for GMO Crops?

It is well known that Roundup is sprayed directly on GMO crops like corn and soy because they are genetically engineered to withstand the toxic onslaught without withering. So much Roundup is used on GMO crops, in fact, that herbicide-resistant “superweeds” are now a huge problem little more than a decade later (1).

“If Roundup kills plants that aren’t genetically modified to resist it, then why use it on nonGMO crops?”

“Wouldn’t glyphosate kill a nonGMO crop?”

“Why would a farmer do this?”

Indeed, these common consumer questions indicate the ultimate irony of using Roundup for desiccation purposes on a food crop producing farm. Killing the crop and/or the greenery around it is actually the whole idea. For crops like wheat, it evens up the field, allows for an earlier harvest, protects machinery and/or increases profit.

The  Bottom Line?

Pre-harvest treatment of crops with glyphosate helps farmers to harvest their crops more efficiently and at less cost (2)

Crazy as it may seem, Roundup is used everywhere in the North American conventional food supply and not just on GMO crops or to kill weeds!

Glyphosate is applied directly to dozens of nonGMO food crops, in many cases, right before they are harvested. This is the worst possible time to apply a herbicide because it causes the glyphosate to be absorbed into the food crop directly. In other words, the glyphosate can’t be washed off later as it has become part of the food. This toxin will then be ingested by those who consume it either directly as a “whole food” or via processed foods that contain it as an ingredient.

According to the Cornucopia Institute:

Ubiquitous in food production, glyphosate is used not just with row crops like corn, soybeans and wheat but also a range of fruits, nuts and veggies. Even spinach growers use glyphosate (3).

Desiccating crops with herbicides before harvest is catching on in the UK as well where summers are wet and crops may ripen ripen slowly and unevenly. This can potentially lead to reduced yields and a lower quality crop. For example, 78% of the UK oilseed rape crop (similar to canola) is desiccated before harvest, but only 4% in Germany (4).

(READ FULL ARTICLE)

11 Fake Foods You Eat All the Time

FOODS_FAKES3

By McKenzie Maxson July 21, 2016 |

If you pick up a block of Parmesan cheese at the grocery store, you assume it’s the good stuff, preferably from Italy. But many times it’s mixed with cheaper cheeses and sometimes wood pulp. (Now that’s something to chew on!) Larry Olmsted calls out these frauds in his book Real Food/Fake Food. Here are the biggest offenders:

1. Coffee

If you brew your own pot at home, buy your beans whole, not ground. Ground coffee often contains additives, such as wheat, barley, and even twigs (crunchy!), because it’s cheaper and harder to tell the difference in the bag.

2. Tea

Tea seems like such a wholesome drink, but some varieties are mixed with other leaves and sometimes even sawdust to make it last longer, Olmsted says.

3. Sushi

If you order a spicy salmon roll, chances are that’s not what you’re getting. Oceana, a nonprofit marine conservation group, found that 100 percent of the seafood it tested at sushi restaurants in New York was not the fish it was claimed to be.

4. Fish

Red snapper and grouper are almost always fake because they’re expensive, Olmsted says. Some of the fish sold as grouper couldn’t be identified when tested. Ew.

5. Extra-virgin olive oil

There’s no use splurging on the good stuff. Even though it’s marketed as “pure,” EVOO is often stripped of many nutrients and diluted with peanut or soybean oil, which are cheaper.

6. Parmesan cheese

The Parmesan on shelves in the U.S. is far cry from the authentic Italian kind. A recent FDA study found it tends to be cut with less expensive cheese and sometimes even wood pulp.

7. Honey

Here’s a not-so-sweet secret: There aren’t regulations on what gets called honey. Some companies mix it with high-fructose corn syrup, so make sure you read all the ingredients.

8. Dry spices

Lab tests found instances where oregano included weeds and turmeric contained corn.

9. Champagne

You’ve probably heard sparkling wine can’t be called Champagne unless it comes from the Champagne region of France. But that doesn’t stop companies from being deceptive. André still claims to be Champagne, but that bottle of booze comes from California, not France.

10. Kobe beef

The USDA is very strict about Kobe beef imports. Just 10 companies are allowed to sell the meat in the U.S. (you can see the list here). So chances are, you aren’t getting the real stuff.

11. Fruit juice

Just because a container says “pomegranate juice” doesn’t mean it only contains the one fruit. In many instances, expensive juices are mixed with cheaper ones (like apple) to cut costs, so check the label every time. If it doesn’t list percentages, don’t buy it.

Toxics and New Borns

naturalnews.com

Originally published July 21 2016

 BLACK_NATION_BC-DEATH PLAN\

Study: Toxic chemicals in makeup, plastics and other everyday products are
harming unborn babies, damaging the brain and reducing IQs

by Amy Goodrich

(NaturalNews) Most consumers generally assume that products available on the market are proven to be safe. They believe that the government would not allow any product on the market that may be harmful to their health.

Unfortunately, this is not true. Many products sold today contain toxic ingredients with very limited safety testing. A growing number of researchers now believe that a variety of chemicals found in everyday household items, such as makeup, plastics, and food containers, may pose a serious threat to the developing brain of fetuses and growing children. These chemicals may even be lowering their IQ.

In a first-of-its-kind consensus statement, called Project TENDR (Targeting Environmental Neuro-Developmental Risks), dozens of scientists, health practitioners, and children’s health advocates are calling for a more aggressive regulation.

The aim of the coalition is to protect expectant mothers, infants, and children from toxic chemicals that endanger neurodevelopment in fetuses and children of all ages.

 

A broken system

In the statement, the authors concluded that the existing system in the U.S. for evaluating scientific evidence and making health-based decisions about environmental chemicals is “fundamentally broken.”

American children are at an “unacceptable” risk of developing neurological disorders including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disabilities, and other learning and behavioral disabilities. Parents report that one in six American children have a developmental disability, which is 17 percent more than a decade ago.

These rising neurological defects are very complex disorders caused by genetic, social, and environmental factors. While we cannot change our genetic makeup, the toxic effect chemicals have on our health can, and should, be prevented.

One way pregnant women can protect their little one and build up immunity is through juicing health-promoting superfoods.

 

Chemicals are everywhere

The report gives bad press to the U.S. that continues to allow these chemicals to flood the market with little or no evidence of the effects they may have on the developing brain. With the TENDR consensus statement, the authors hope to reduce toxic chemical exposure and neurodevelopmental disabilities in America’s children.

The chemicals singled out by the coalition include lead, mercury, organophosphate pesticides used in agriculture and gardens, flame retardants, combustion-related air pollutants, and phthalates found in plastic bottles, food containers, and beauty products.

Furthermore, they note that traffic pollution and smoke from wood can also affect the neurological development of both unborn baby and growing child.

While polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been banned or restricted in America for years, the authors report that these can linger in the environment for decades and are also reason for concern.

 

Chemicals are everywhere

Professor Susan Schantz, of the University of Illinois, said that these chemicals are not only found in air and water, but also in everyday products that we use in our home or apply on our skin. Reducing the exposure is possible and urgently needed to protect our future generation.

Almost every day we come in contact with phthalates and other endocrine disruptors found in all kinds of different products. As reported by the Daily Mail, 90 percent of pregnant women in the U.S. have detectable levels of 62 different chemicals.

Many of these chemicals can interfere with the normal activity of hormones, like thyroid hormones, estrogen, and androgens. Schantz and her colleagues are studying the effects phthalates and other endocrine disruptors have on the child’s brain and behavior.

Professor Schantz said that very little is known about what these chemicals are doing to children’s neurological development.

“They just haven’t been studied.”, Schantz said. She expressed that if it looks like something is a risk, many scientists feel policymakers should be willing to make a decision that the chemical could be trouble and we need to stop its production or limit its use. Professor Schantz went on to say, “We shouldn’t have to wait 10 or 15 years — allowing countless children to be exposed to it in the meantime — until we’re positive it’s a bad actor.”

Sources for this article include:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP358/
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160701093942.htm
http://huromslowjuicers.naturalnews.com/huromslowjuicers.html

 

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